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RGO Archives contains:
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RGO 35 Photographs and Photocopies
RGO 36 Microfilms of RGO Archives Collections
RGO 37 Papers of Roderick Redman
RGO 38 Inventories of Manuscripts
RGO 39 Inventories of Instruments, Art, Furniture, etc.
RGO 4 Papers of Nevil Maskelyne
RGO 40 Rules and Regulations
RGO 41 Cape of Good Hope Publications
RGO 45 Papers of John Guy Porter
RGO 46 Papers of Leslie John Comrie
RGO 47 Anglo-Australian Telescope papers
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Papers of Nevil Maskelyne

Title Papers of Nevil Maskelyne
Reference GBR/0180/RGO 4
Creator Maskelyne, Nevil
Covering Dates circa 1706-circa 1843
Extent and Medium 52 boxes + 1 bundle; paper
Repository Royal Greenwich Observatory Archives
Content and context

Nevil Maskelyne (1732-1811) was born in London on 6 October 1732, and educated at Westminster School. He entered Catherine Hall, Cambridge, in 1749, but migrated subsequently to Trinity College (B.A., 1754; M.A., 1757; D.D., 1777), where he became a Fellow in 1757. He was ordained curate of Barnet, Hertfordshire, in 1755, and received the living of Shrawardine, Shropshire, 1775, and the rectory of North Runcton, Norfolk, 1782.

Maskelyne first developed an interest in astronomy and optics after viewing the solar eclipse of July 1748. During the 1750s, he made the acquaintance of James Bradley, the Astronomer Royal, and with his support he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1758. In 1761 he was sent by the Society to St Helena, where he failed in an attempt to observe the transit of Venus. He was appointed Astronomer Royal in 1765, in succession to Bradley, and oversaw the publication of the first 'Nautical Almanac' in 1766. As Astronomer Royal, Maskelyne was closely involved in the efforts to establish longitude by means of lunar distances and the use of marine chronometers, and during the 1760s and 1770s he supervised the testing of John Harrison's chronometers. In 1774 he planned and superintended the Schiehallion Experiment, which attempted to determine the earth's density by examining the gravitational attraction of a mountain in Perthshire. During his lifetime, he made over 90,000 observations, which were published in instalments between 1776 and 1811. He died at Greenwich Observatory on 9 February 1811.

The collection comprises a large series of observations, calculations, computations and tables, with accounts, booklets, illustrations, journals of voyages, notes, treatises and other material. There is a large volume of correspondence, which reflects the varied nature of the Astronomer Royal's work, and includes correspondence with computers and comparers; letters from Gauss, Piazzi, Zach and Olbers, who contacted Maskelyne at the time of the discovery of the minor planets; and correspondence with Charles Mason about the 1769 transit of Venus. The subjects covered in the collection include marine chronometers and mathematical astronomy, the Schielhallion Experiment, Maskelyne's early life, and Charles Mason's calculation of the Moon's place. The papers are mainly in English, with other languages featuring intermittently.

The bulk of the papers became part of the Observatory's archives following the death of Nevil Maskelyne. RGO 4/150-229 were presented by Mrs Arnold Foster in 1911. RGO 4/320 originally belonged to N. Arnold Foster, and was transferred to the National Maritime Museum by Col. Quill, 23 March 1967, and to the Royal Greenwich Observatory, 12 August 1975.

Access and Use

In English, Fre, Ger, Italian, Latin

Please cite as Royal Greenwich Observatory Archives, Papers of Nevil Maskelyne, RGO 4

Further information

A word-processed handlist is available in the Manuscripts Reading Room. Indexed

This description was created by Robert Steiner, Department of Manuscripts and University Archives. The biographical history was compiled with reference to the entry on Nevil Maskelyne in Sidney Lee, ed., 'Dictionary of National Biography', Vol. XII (London, 1909), pp. 1299-1301.

Index Terms
Maskelyne, Nevil (1732-1811) astronomer and mathematician
RGO Archives/RGO 4 contains:
1 Observations. A rough copy of observations of major stars made in 1758 and on a voyage of 1764. The volume includes adjustments to the barometer and atmospheric conditions, 1758; calculations of star positions; the longitude of various foreign towns; corrections to the sextant and quadrant; and calculations to discover longitude.
1 volume.
1758–1764
2 Observations at St Helena. Observations with the zenith sector at St Helena, including descriptions of the observational techniques involved and an account of the zenith distances of the stars taken with the ten foot sector.
1 volume.
1761–1762
3 Observations of transits. A working copy of transit observations of the major stars, 7 May 1765 - 18 July 1771, with notes on the adjustments and alterations to the instruments and observational technique. The observations include the eclipse of 5 August 1766; the transit of Venus on 3 June 1769; numerous immersions of stars and Jupiter's satellites; and a Royal visit on 2 June 1768.
1 volume.
1765–1771
4 Observations of transits. A working copy of transit observations of the major stars, 19 July 1771 - 31 December 1778. The volume lists Maskelyne's assistants during this period, alterations to the telescope during 1774-1778, and the observational technique employed. The observations include the appulse of 18 February 1775, the total eclipse of the Moon on 29 July 1776, and the eclipse of the Sun on 28 June 1778, as well as numerous immersions of the stars and Jupiter's satellites.
1 volume.
1771–1778
5 Observations of transits. A working copy of transit observations of the major stars, 1 January 1779 - 4 October 1787, with notes on the adjustments and alterations to the instruments and on observational technique. The observations include a table on the Pole Star's position, 1779-1787; repairs and alterations to the transit telescope, 1779-1787; changes to the buildings at Greenwich, 30 July - 22 October 1779; eclipses of the Moon, 18 March 1783 and 6 March 1784; a total eclipse of the Moon, 10 September 1783; the occultation of Venus by the Moon, 12 April 1785; a transit of Mercury over the Sun, 3 May 1786; and various immersions of the stars and Jupiter's satellites.
1 volume.
1779–1787
6 Observations of transits. A working copy of transit observations of the major stars, 5 October 1787 - 30 December 1797, with notes on adjustments and alterations to observational technique. The beginning of the book has tables and details of the temperature of the Transit Room, 1792-1796; adjustments to the transit telescope, 1787-1793 and 1797-1798; 'Levelling the Axis by Nairne's Ground Level', 1790-1797; errors in the transit telescope, 1787-1797; swing of the pendulum, 1792-1797; and notes on observational technique, mentioning that the transit telescope was 'stoned' on 13 August 1792. The observations include eclipses of the Moon on 22 October 1790, 3 February 1795 and 3 December 1797; an eclipse of the Sun on 3 April 1790; and various immersions of stars and Jupiter's satellites. There is also an account of the disappearance and reappearance of Saturn's rings, 1789-1790.
1 volume.
1787–1797
7 Observations of transits. A working copy of transit observations of the major stars, 1 January 1798 - 28 December 1803, with notes on the adjustments and alterations to observational technique. The observations include the transit of Mercury over the Sun, 6 May 1799 and 8 November 1802; the passage of the Moon through the Pleiades, 23 October 1801; and an eclipse of the Sun, 11 August 1803. There are accounts of 'Observations of the vibrations of the Pendulum Clocks', 1798-1803, and immersions of stars and Jupiter's satellites.
1 volume.
1798–1803
8 Observations of transits. A working copy of transit observations of the major stars, 1 January 1804 - 30 December 1811, with notes on the adjustments and alterations to observational technique. The observations include immersions of the stars and Jupiter's satellites; a Royal visit on 3 June 1805; an eclipse of the Sun on 16 June 1806; a piece about woodworm in the transit clock; and a column recording Transit Room temperatures, 1804-1811. All the observations from 5 September 1810 were performed by Thomas Taylor. He probably continued until 30 August 1811, when the observations appear in John Pond's handwriting.
1 volume.
1804–1811
9 Observations of transits. A rough copy of transit observations of the major stars, 22 November 1788 - 9 September 1810, including an eclipse of the Moon on 2 November 1789. There are some notes on adjustments and observational technique, and a few quadrant observations for the years 1801, 1811, 1817 and 1821.
1 volume.
1788–1821
10 Calculations for transit telescope. A working copy of calculations and resultant tables for the levelling of the transit telescope, 1787-1805, and experiments on the transit axis, with a description of the procedure from which the results were obtained.
1 volume.
1787–1805
11 Calculations for transit telescope. A working copy of calculations and resultant tables for the levelling of the transit telescope, 1806-1811; the position of major stars in 1822; intervals between the wires on the new transit, 1816-1817; and observations of major stars, 1816-1817.
1 volume.
1806–1822
12 Transit telescope wire intervals. A working copy of intervals of wires of the transit telescope. These include observations of major stars, 1765-1771; the rate of the transit clock, 7 May 1765 - 30 December 1776; and the 'Daily Rate of Transit with Ruby Palletts', 10 August 1771 - 2 March 1772.
1 volume.
1765–1776
13 Observations of transits. A working copy of transit observations of the major stars. The volume includes observed times of the Sun's diameter passing the meridian, 1773-1783; mean right ascension of the principal stars, 6 June 1765 - 31 December 1783, with descriptions of how the results were obtained; calculations and tables for the equatorial intervals of the wires in the transit telescope and stars observed thereof; the Sun's diameter measured with the mural quadrant, 1786; and the Sun's diameter at times of solstice, 1765-1787. There are also equatorial intervals of Mars, 1799-1802, and miscellaneous observations of stars, 1801-1808.
1 volume.
1765–1808
14 Computations to obtain right ascensions. Computations for obtaining mean right ascensions of the stars and planets derived from transit observations. 1. Computations of mean right ascension of stars from transit observations by comparison with Alpha Aquilae, 1784-1785. 2. Right ascensions of 1st Alpha Capricorni and 1st Alpha Librae, 1782-1785. 3. Computations of mean right ascensions of stars from transits between 6 June 1765 and 5 January 1766. 4. Corrections to the right ascension of the Sun between 3 August 1776 and 31 December 1782, to reduce to the standard of the 1776 and 1782 Nautical Catalogues. There are similar corrections for the period 28 August 1762 to 2 August 1776. 5. Corrections of the Sun's longitude in conjunction with its corrected right ascension for 13 September 1762 to 2 August 1776. 6. Intervals between wires in the transit telescope, 1796-1797. 7. Further corrections to the Sun's right ascension, 1783-1787. 8. Computation for mean right ascensions of the stars from transit observations, 1796-1797. 9. Corrections of right ascensions of the Sun, Moon and planets for errors in the line of collimation, 1795-1796. 10. Computation of mean right ascensions of stars from transit observations, 1797-1805. 11. Intervals between transit telescope wires, with observations, 1799.
1 volume.
1762–1805
15 Computations to obtain right ascensions. Computations of apparent and mean right ascensions of stars deduced from transit observations made in comparison with Alpha Aquilae, with a brief account of the technique employed. The observations were performed between 21 November 1805 and 30 December 1807, and 1 and 5 January 1820.
1 volume.
1805–1820
16 Right ascensions. Right ascensions of 36 principal stars in sidereal time deduced from James Bradley's observations (1750-1758) and corrected up to 1758. There is also a comparison with the 'Nautical Catalogue' of 1805, apparently to determine values for proper motion.
1 volume.
circa 1750-circa 1805
17 Stellar observations. Various observations of stars. The volume has been bound incorrectly and the articles are out of sequence. It is chiefly a work on the right ascensions of stars as derived from observations of the star Eta Aquilae. 1. Mural quadrant observations of Arcturus made by James Bradley, 5 May 1743, with other references to that star. 2. A table on the motion of stars, 1750-1790. 3. Right ascension of Pegasus, 1765-1766. 4. Mean right ascensions of stars to 1765. 5. Comparisons of right ascensions of stars with Alpha Aquilae, 1765. 6. Account on how to find the right ascensions of stars. 7. Table on the right ascension of the Sun. 8. Account on how to calculate the necessary corrections to the assumed right ascensions of Alpha Aquilae and other stars. 9. Right ascensions of the stars. 10. Corrected assumed right ascensions of Alpha Aquilae and other stars. 11. Corrected right ascensions of 41 stars. 12. Mean right ascensions of stars used daily, 1765-1770. 13. Mean right ascensions of stars with which the 1769 comet was compared. 14. Mean right ascensions of stars deduced from observations up to 1770. 15. Mean polar distance of stars up to the start of 1770. 16. Stars compared with Alpha Aquilae in 1770. 17. Number of comparisons of stars to Alpha Aquilae, 1765-1772. 18. Corrections to the right ascensions of Alpha Aquilae and other stars, 1771. 19. Stars compared with Alpha Aquilae in 1771. 20. Results of comparisons of stars with Alpha Aquilae, 1784-1785. 21. Catalogue of stars, 1786-1788. 22. Different right ascensions of the Sun, 1783-1784. 23. Temperature readings, 1782-1786. 24. Star positions, 1771. 25. Star corrections by comparison with transits of the Sun, Moon and planets, 1767-1771. 26. Mean right ascension of a star (probably Alpha Aquilae) for 1772 and 1780. 27. Stars compared with Alpha Aquilae, 1779-1781. 28. Places of the stars to the beginning of 1780 from comparisons with Alpha Aquilae. 29. Stars compared with Alpha Aquilae, 1781-1783. 30. Results of comparisons of stars with Alpha Aquilae, 1782-1784. 31. Catalogue of stars, 1782-1784. 32. Corrections to the right ascension of Alpha Aquilae and the other stars, 1782-1783. 33. Stars compared to Alpha Aquilae, 1784-1785. 34. Stars compared to Alpha Aquilae, 1765-1766, with some observations crossed out. 35. Annual proper motions of the stars deduced from right ascensions, 1750-1800. 36. Mean right ascensions of 36 principal stars, 1762-1802. 37. Comparison of mean transits of the Moon's limb at each transit telescope wire, 1765-1766. 38. Right ascensions of the stars compared with Alpha Aquilae, 1796-1801. 39. Right ascension of the Sun deduced from zenith distances, 1798-1800. 40. Stars compared with Alpha Aquilae, 1801. 41. Comparison of Beta Virginis and Beta Leonis in right ascension, 1798-1801. 42. Mean right ascension of 2 Alpha Librae, 1798-1801. 43. Position of 2 Alpha Librae, 1790-1797. 44. Sun's right ascension in relation to the stars, 1801-1802. 45. Proper motion of the stars, inferred from the 1766 and 1802 catalogues of stars. 46. Sun's right ascension with the stars, 1803. 47. Comparison of the stars with Alpha Aquilae, 1803-1805. 48. Comparisons of the stars' right ascensions, updated to 1805. 49. Sun's right ascension derived from Alpha Aquilae, 1804-1805. 50. Difference in mean right ascensions of stars between 1756 and 1803. 51. Sun's right ascension as derived from the transits of the stars, 1805-1808. 52. Positions of the major stars, 1806-1807. 53. Differences in the right ascensions of 36 principal stars, 1805-1808. 54. Sun's right ascension, 1753-1760. 55. Stars with which the 1807-1808 comet was compared. 56. Mean right ascensions and zenith distances of the stars with which the comet of 1807-1808 was compared. 57. Stars with which the comet of 1807-1808 was compared. 58. Apparent right ascensions and north polar distances of stars when observed with the comet. 59. Right ascensions of principal stars, 1815-1822.
1 volume.
1743–1822
18 Moon's longitude and stellar right ascensions. Book of equations and observations of the Moon's longitude and the right ascensions of stars. 1. Equations of the Moon's longitude and latitude, 1763-1771, most of the observations dating from 1765-1770. 2. Numbers for computing the right ascension of the Pole Star to the middle of 1797. 3. Mean right ascension of Polaris, 1795. 4. Mean right ascensions of Polaris and other circumpolar stars, 1797-1805. 5. Calculations to find the error of the clock in order to ascertain right ascension of the Pole Star. 6. Mean right ascension of the Pole Star given in time, 1805. 7. Mean right ascensions of stars, 1802-1804. 8. Differences in right ascensions of stars in 1756 and 1803, thus deducing their motion. 9. Right ascensions of stars, 1750-1760. 10. Intervals of the transit telescope wires, 1816. 11. Corrections to the right ascensions of Capella, Alpha Lyrae and Alpha Cygni from the 1784 catalogue, with corrections for 1795. 12. Calculations to ascertain the error of the line of collimation, 1795.
1 volume.
1762–1816
19 Calculations of right ascensions. Calculations of the apparent right ascensions of the Sun, Moon and planets observed by the 8 foot transit telescope, 1 January 1774 - 18 December 1780. The volume also includes computations for instrumental errors, 7 June - 18 August 1793 and 19-28 July 1795, and computations for the right ascension of the Sun, 3 July 1765 - 4 January 1766.
1 volume.
1765–1795
20 Mean times of Moon's transit. Computations for the mean times for the Moon's transit. (MISSING).
1 volume.
1774
21 Calculations of right ascensions. Calculations of the apparent right ascensions of the Sun, Moon and planets from observations taken with the 8 foot transit telescope, 2 January 1781 - 29 November 1787, with corrections.
1 volume.
1781–1787
22 Calculations of right ascensions. Calculations of the apparent right ascensions of the Sun, Moon and planets from observations taken with the 8 foot transit telescope, 29 November 1787 and 16 February 1796, listing the people who computed the observations. There are also rules and examples of calculations for computing imperfect transits and a printed page on the 'Epoch of the Sun's Mean Right Ascension in Time', 1723-1811, from the 'Nautical Almanac', with manuscript additions.
1 volume.
1723-circa 1811
23 Right ascension of the Moon's limb. Right ascension of the Moon's limb in time, 30 August 1762 - 28 December 1787 and January 1788 - 3 May 1797. Mean and apparent times have been added.
1 volume.
1762–1797
24 Calculations of right ascensions. Corrections of the calculated right ascensions of the planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and the Georgian planet (Uranus).
1 volume.
1762–1787
25 Right ascension of the Moon's limb. Corrections of the right ascension of the Moon's limb computed from observations of the Moon, 30 August 1762 - 28 December 1787.
1 volume.
1762–1787
26 Calculations of right ascensions. Calculations of the right ascensions of the Sun, Moon and planets, 16 February 1796 - 16 July 1805, and of clock errors and rates. There is also a collection of figures for right ascensions of the Moon and planets for 1804 and 1805, and deductions of mean right ascensions of some small stars between 1802 and 1809.
1 volume.
1796–1809
27 Transits and right ascensions. Transits and computations for the right ascensions of the Sun, Moon and planets, 18 July 1805 - 29 June 1812. Some of these observations were undertaken by John Pond.
1 volume.
1805–1812
28 Quadrant and zenith sector observations. A rough copy of quadrant and zenith sector observations of major stars. The volume begins with a list of Maskelyne's assistants and a note on days on which each star was observed with the quadrant, 1765-1776. The book deals at length with quadrant observations from 7 May 1765 to 30 December 1785, mentioning tests on John Bird's thermometer and adjustments and alterations to observational technique. There are zenith sector observations for the years 1768-1769 and 1776-1777; observed distances of fixed stars from the zenith with the zenith sector; and adjustments to the quadrant, 1775-1786.
1 volume.
1765–1786
29 Quadrant observations. A rough copy of quadrant observations, 1 January 1786 - 19 August 1811. The observations from 9 February 1811 were made by John Pond. The book also contains a rule to find how many seconds it takes a celestial object to pass through the wires in the mural quadrant; observed distances of the fixed stars from the zenith with the zenith sector, 1810; a chronology of repairs and adjustments to the quadrant, 1786-1808; and errors in observations of the Moon, 1804-1808.
1 volume.
1786–1811
30 Transit circle clock rates. Daily rate of the transit circle clock deduced from the transits of the fixed stars, 29 August 1762 - 19 March 1765. The volume has notes and rules on calculating these figures. The observations were performed by Nathaniel Bliss until 22 September 1764, and by Charles Green from then until 15 March 1765.
1 volume.
1762–1765
31 Quadrant observations reductions. Reduction of quadrant observations by applying refraction, the parallax of the Sun and nutation, 24 August 1762 - 7 March 1764. There are also observations of the intervals of transit telescope wires used by Nathaniel Bliss, 1762-1764.
1 volume.
1762–1764
32 Zenith distance computations. Computations of the zenith distances of the stars, Sun, Moon and planets, 7 May 1765 - 20 June 1773. The parallaxes of the Moon and planets have not been computed in all cases.
1 volume.
1765–1773
33 Zenith distance computations. Computations of observed zenith distances, 30 June 1773 - 30 December 1786, apparently calculated for a) refraction, in all cases; b) parallax of the Sun; c) the semi-diameters of the Sun and Moon; and d) the parallax of the Moon, in parts. At the end of the book are the positions of the stars in the constellation Gemini.
1 volume.
1773–1786
34 Zenith distance and quadrant observations. Zenith distances and quadrant observations. 1. Observed zenith distances, 7 January - 7 November 1787. These have only been partly reduced. 2. Observed zenith distances of the Sun's centre, 10 November 1787 - 1 March 1790, reduced and compared with the 'Nautical Almanac'. 3. Reduced observed zenith distances of the stars with the quadrant, 1767-1771 and 1787-1802, with notes and explanations. 4. Reduction of James Bradley's zenith sector observations. 5. Reduced zenith distances with the quadrant, 1803-1806. 6. Reduced quadrant observations of stars, 1753-1756. 7. Reduced quadrant observations of stars, 1802-1806. 8. Comparison of north polar distances of stars for the years 1756 and 1803. 9. Reduced zenith distances from quadrant observations of Polaris and Gamma Draconis, 1806-1807. 10. Reduced zenith distances from quadrant observations of Polaris, 1751-1753. 11. Reduced zenith distances from quadrant observations of Gamma Draconis, 1807. 12. Observed zenith distances of circumpolar stars, 1750-1759. 13 Reduced zenith distances from quadrant observations of Gamma Draconis, 1808-1811. 14. Observed and reduced zenith distances of principal stars, 1753-1762.
1 volume.
1750–1811
35 Reduction of the Moon's place. Reductions of the Moon's place for the period 13 September 1750 to 23 August 1760, with reference to Johann Mayer's improved tables. The volume includes the techniques employed for the observations and some corrections.
1 volume.
1750–1760
36 Reduction of quadrant observations. Reduction of quadrant observations of the stars in the feet of Gemini, 1 October 1767 - 6 October 1805, with notes on observational technique and alterations to the telescope. There is also a formula for computing aberration in north polar distance and a table on the annual variations of right ascensions and north polar distances of stars in the feet of Gemini, 1768-1805.
1 volume.
1767–1805
37 Observations of major stars. Various observations of the major stars. 1. Catalogue of right ascensions of stars compared with Alpha Aquilae, 1765-1766. 2. Problem to find the small differences of the interval of time of two stars passing two given wires in the transit telescope, including methodology and examples. 3. James Bradley's solstices, 1753-1760. 4. Corrections to the line of collimation in the quadrant, 1765-1808, tested by observations of Gamma Draconis and other stars. 5. Observations of stars in Gemini, 1753-1786. 6. Solstices, 1750-1820. 7. Observations of the stars in respect to the line of collimation, 1754-1787. 8. Detailed calculations of solstices, 1765-1791. . 9. Stars observed in Gemini, 1768-1795. 10. Detailed calculations of solstices, 1789-1800. 11. Stars observed in Gemini, 1796-1805. 12. Detailed calculations of solstices, 1801-1809. 13. Observations of Gamma Draconis with the zenith sector and quadrant, 1800-1811, compared with Bradley's reductions for the solstices between 1750 and 1760. There is an 1805 observation of Gemini to check the line of collimation. From this point the pages are inverted in the binding. 14. Observations of circumpolar stars and intervals of wires within the transit telescope, 1785. 15. Transits and computations of right ascensions for stars compared to comets, 1769-1779. 16. Observations on the intervals of transit telescope wires, 1765-1767.
1 volume.
circa 1750-circa 1820
38 Calculations and observations. Various calculations and observations of stars and planets. 1. Observations and calculations of Gamma Draconis, 1809. 2. Calculations of refraction for the Sun, Moon and planets, 1809-1810. 3. Equations for Gamma Draconis in zenith distance, 1810-1811. 4. Refraction of the Sun, Moon and planets, 1811. 5. Calculations for the Sun's declination, 1812. 6. Calculations for the Sun's right ascension for the observed zenith distance about the equinox, 1806. 7. Refractions of various stars, 1812. 8. Calculations of a summer solstice, year unknown. 9. Calculations for finding the equatorial intervals of the transit telescope wires. 10. Mean times of the occultation of Jupiter's satellites, 1810.
1 volume.
1806–1812
39 Sun's longitude and latitude. The Sun's longitude and latitude calculated from observed right ascension and declination, in comparison with its tabular place, covering the period 28 August 1762 - 2 March 1765.
1 volume.
1762–1765
40 Sun's longitude and latitude. The Sun's longitude and latitude deduced from observation and compared with tables, a tabulated version of RGO 4/39.
1 volume.
1762–1765
41 Computations for the Sun, Moon and planets. Computations of the positions of the Sun, Moon and planets. The calculations were performed by Reuben Burrow between 24 August 1762 and 3 March 1765. . 1. Sun's declination and obliquity. 2. Computation of the Sun's longitude and latitude from right ascension and declination as compared with 'Connaissance des Temps'. 3. Computation of the Sun's longitude from Johann Mayer's tables. 4. Mean times of the meridian transits of the Moon. 5. Mean times of the meridian transits of the planets. 6. Rough calculations which, according to the 19th century cover label, are of planets' places from Edmond Halley's tables.
1 volume.
1762–1765
42 Computations for the Sun, Moon and planets. Computations of the positions of the Sun, Moon and planets performed by William Bayly and Reuben Burrow from observations taken when Nathaniel Bliss was Astronomer Royal. 1. The Sun's right ascension and declination, clock errors, and longitude and latitude derived from observations and Johann Mayer's tables for 11 May 1765 to 10 May 1767. 2. Moon's right ascension and declination, clock errors, and longitude and latitude derived from observations and Mayer's tables for 31 May 1765 to 10 May 1767. 3. The planets' right ascensions and declinations, clock errors and longitude and latitude derived from observations and Edmond Halley or Mayer's tables for 19 August 1765 to 23 December 1766. 4. Further calculations for the Moon, updated to 7 June 1768. 5. Further calculations for the Sun, updated to 23 January 1768. 6. Transits of the Sun, Moon and planets from which clock errors are deduced, 27 August 1762 - 2 March 1765. 7. List of planets observed, 1762-1765.
1 volume.
1762–1768
43 Computations for the Sun and Moon. Computations of the positions of the Moon and Sun. 1. Computation of Moon's tabular place, 20 November 1765 - 29 April 1766. 2. Cosine and tangent tables. 3. Computations and calculations of the equinoxes, 1766-1767. 4. Reduction of the apparent time of the Sun's passing the meridian to mean time. 5. Sun's position computed from Johann Mayer's tables, 8 May 1766 - 10 May 1767. 6. Moon's position computed from Mayer's tables, 14 May 1766 - 18 December 1766.
1 volume.
1765–1767
44 Computations for the Sun and Moon. Computations made from the observed positions of the Sun and the Moon, with various other computations. 1. Moon's observed position, 17 December 1766 - 10 May 1767. 2. Sun's longitude and latitude observed between 18 May 1765 and 10 May 1767. 3. Moon's observed position, 31 May 1765 - 10 May 1767. 4. Mean time of the transit of the Moon's limb, 12 May 1767 - 23 January 1768. 5. Moon's position and the obliquity of the ecliptic computed 12 May 1767 to 7 January 1768. 6. Moon's observed position, 12 May 1767 - 9 January 1768. 7. Sun's declination observed from 15 May 1767 to 23 January 1768. 8. Sun's longitude observed from 15 May 1767 to 23 January 1768. 9. Johann Mayer's 'Small equations' on the Sun compared to Maskelyne's tables, 15 May 1767 - 23 January 1768. 10. Mean time of transit of planets from 11 May 1765 to 17 December 1767. 11. Planets' positions computed from 11 May 1765 to 4 January 1768.
1 volume.
1765–1768
45 Longitudes and latitudes. Computations from observations primarily of the right ascensions and declinations or the longitudes and latitudes of the Sun, Moon and planets. 1. Sun's declination, 2 May 1768 - 1 January 1769. 2. Obliquity of the ecliptic, 1 August 1767 - 1 November 1769. 3. Sun's declination from 1 August 1767 to 26 January 1769. 4. Sun's longitude from computations of Johann Mayer's tables, 25 January 1768 - 12 May 1768. The computations are missing. 5. Reductions of Mars' transits to mean time, 11 October 1768 - 30 June 1769. 6. Computations of the mean time of the Moon's limb passing the meridian, 26 January 1768 - 29 December. 7. Moon's place from Mayer's tables, 26 January - 26 December 1768. 8. Computations of the Sun's declination, 1768. 9. Computations of the Sun's longitude and latitude from its observed right ascensions and declination, 25 January - 29 December 1768. 10. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from its observed right ascension and declination, 26 January - 29 December 1768. 11. Mean times of the transit of the Moon's limb, 1769. 12. Reduction of the planets' transits to mean time, 1769. 13. Computed planets' longitude and latitude by Edmond Halley's tables, 1769. 14. Computations involving Saturn, 1 January - 24 October 1769. 15. Computations of the Sun's longitude and latitude from its right ascension and declination, 1 January - 29 December 1769. 16. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from Mayer's tables, 1 January - 29 December 1769. From this point in the volume the pages are inverted. 17. Sun's declination reduced from observations in 1769. 18. Computations on the apparent obliquity of the ecliptic, 1769. 19. Computations of Mars' longitude and latitude from its right ascension and declination, 11 October - 8 November 1768. 20. Computations of the mean times of transits of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter, 1 May - 17 October 1768. 21. Computations of Mars' longitude, 11 April 1768 - 8 November 1768.
1 volume.
1767–1769
46 Errors of Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. Errors of Mars, Jupiter and Saturn in longitude and latitude, apparently compared with Edmond Halley's tables.
1 volume.
1765–1771
47 Computations for miscellaneous phenomena. Computations made from observations of many different astronomical phenomena. 1. Computation of some of the mean times of the Moon's observations, lined through. 2. Mean times of the observations of the 1769 comet. 3. Mean times of the meridian transits of planets, 1770. 4. Apparent obliquity of the ecliptic, 1770. 5. Computation of the Sun's declination, 5 January - 23 December 1770. 6. Sun's longitude and latitude derived from its right ascension and declination or north polar distance, 5 January - 22 December 1770. 7. Computation of Johann Mayer's small equations of the Sun, 5 January - 22 December 1770. 8. Computation of the longitudes and latitudes of Mercury, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn in 1768. 9. Computation of the true right ascension and declination of the 1769 comet. 10. Reduction of observations of the 1769 comet made with the equatorial sector. 11. Computation of the 1769 comet's longitude and latitude (two sets of calculations). 12. Computation of eclipses of Jupiter's third satellite from tables in the ephemeris, 1760-1771. 13. Longitude and latitude of various major stars. 14. Mean time of the planets' transits observed in 1770. 15. Mean time of the Moon's transits, 3 January - December 1771. 16. Mean time of transits of Saturn, 1771. 17. Sun's declination and the obliquity of the ecliptic, 3 January 1771 - 26 July 1772. 18. Sun's longitude and latitude as observed between 1 January and 30 December 1771. 19. Sun's declination and the obliquity of the ecliptic, 7 August 1772 - 31 December 1776. 20. Sun's longitude and latitude as observed between 8 January 1772 and 30 December 1774. 21. Computation of Mayer's small equations of the Sun, 1772-1774. 22. Mean time of Moon's transits, 1775. 23. Mean time of some transits of the planets, 1775. 24. Computation of the Moon's longitude and latitude from right ascension and declination, year unknown. The extract is inverted and at the back of the book.
1 volume.
1760–1776
48 Calculations of the Sun's longitude. Calculations of the Sun's longitude from its observed right ascension, in comparison with Johann Mayer's tables or the 'Nautical Almanac', covering the period 28 August 1762 - 2 August 1776. The mean obliquity of the ecliptic is in tabular form, 1762-1776, and is continued forward to 1782 on the inside of the cover.
1 volume.
1762–1782
49 Calculations of the Sun's longitude. Computations of the Sun's longitude from its observed right ascension, compared with the 'Nautical Almanac' of 1766 and 1784, covering the period 3 August 1776 - 31 December 1782.
1 volume.
1776–1782
50 Calculations of the Sun's longitude. Computations of the Sun's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and declination, compared with the 'Nautical Almanac', covering the period 1 January 1775 - 31 December 1782. The volume includes the mean obliquity of the ecliptic for various days in 1775 and for 1783-1786. There is also an unfinished diagram.
1 volume.
1775–1786
51 Sun's observed right ascension. The Sun's observed right ascension and longitude in comparison with Johann Mayer's tables, 28 August 1762 - 31 December 1782, a corrected and updated version of RGO 4/48.
1 volume.
1762–1782
52 Calculations on Uranus. Calculations of the apparent right ascension of the Georgian Planet (Uranus), 25 September 1781 -13 January 1786. There are also calculations of the mean right ascensions of stars in the feet of Gemini.
1 volume.
1781–1786
53 Computation of the Sun's longitude. Computations of the Sun's longitude from observed right ascension, in comparison with the 'Nautical Almanac', covering the period 1 January 1783 - 4 March 1794. Each year has its mean obliquity of the ecliptic given and extended to 1796.
1 volume.
1783–1796
54 Sun's observed right ascension. The Sun's observed right ascension in time and in arc and its deduced longitude as compared to Johann Mayer's tables, 1 January 1787 - 20 December 1796. The volume lists Maskelyne's assistants from 1783 to 1796.
1 volume.
1783–1796
55 Computation of the Sun's longitude. Computations of the Sun's longitude from observed right ascension, in comparison with the 'Nautical Almanac', covering the period 11 March 1794 - 31 December 1804. The mean obliquity of the ecliptic has been calculated for each year.
1 volume.
1794–1804
56 Computation of the Sun's longitude. Computations of the Sun's longitude from its observed right ascension, with the yearly mean obliquity of the ecliptic, covering 1 January 1804 - 5 May 1812.
1 volume.
1804–1812
57 Computation of the Sun's declination. Computations of the Sun's declination from its zenith distance, 4 December 1809 - 20 September 1816.
1 volume.
1808–1816
58 Eclipses of Jupiter's satellites. Eclipses of Jupiter's four major satellites between 1762 and 1796, and various occultations of fixed stars by the Moon, 1763-1795.
1 volume.
1762–1796
59 Calculations on the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites. Calculations and computational method employed for the apparent times of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites between 2 January 1778 and 9 April 1787. There are also some observations of lunar occultations, the passage of the Moon through the Pleiades and solar eclipses, covering the period 23 January 1778 - 15 June 1787.
1 volume.
1778–1787
60 Calculations on the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites. Calculations and computational method employed to find the apparent times of observations, with reference to the eclipses of the Jovian satellites and lunar occultations, covering the period 10 December 1787 - 23 December 1791.
1 volume.
1787–1791
61 Observations of comets. Observations and descriptions of various comets between 1769 and 1815, with notes on the observational techniques employed. There is an index to the comets, arranged by date. The observations after 1810 were recorded by John Pond.
1 volume.
1769–1815
62 Computations on lunar distances. A rough copy of computations of the lunar distances for 12 January 1767 to 3 December 1770.
1 volume.
1767–1770
63 Lacaille's solar tables. An undated fair copy of Nicholas Louis de Lacaille's solar tables. 1. The approximate equation of time. 2. Mean epoch of the Sun's motion, 1600-1800. 3. Mean annual motion of the Sun, in complete years. 4. Mean daily motion of the Sun, 1 January - 31 December inclusive. 5. Mean motion of the Sun in minutes and hours of a day. 6. Mean anomalies of the Sun. 7. Variations in the equinoxes. 8. Perturbations of Jupiter's orbit. 9. Perturbations of Venus's orbit. 10. Perturbations of the lunar orbit. 11. The true place of the Sun in the ecliptic. 12. Logarithmic distances between the Sun and the Earth, with semi-major axis = 1. 13. Corrections to the logarithmic distances between the Sun and the Earth. 14. Variations in the Sun's position. 15. Longitude of the Sun. 16. Times and motion of the Sun. 17. Obliquities of the ecliptic. 18. Apparent longitude of the Sun, 1746-1752.
1 volume.
circa 1800
64 Calculations of stellar positions. Various calculations from observations, primarily of the stars. 1. Mean right ascensions and north polar distances of the stars compared to the comet of 1807-1808. 2. Table of the position of the comet of 1807-1808 by Dr Brinkby. 3. Calculations of refractions of the stars in James Bradley's observations, 1753-1762. 4. Computation for star corrections for several stars, 1808-1809. 5. Elements for star corrections for several stars, 1808-1809. 6. Elements of aberration in north polar distance for circumpolar stars. 7. Calculations for the Sun reduced to the solstice, 1809-1810. 8. Elements of the 1811 comet.
1 volume.
1753–1811
65 Computations. Various observations, computations and measurements of stars, planets, comets, the Moon and the Sun. 1. Eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, 1803-1804. 2. Reductions for the Moon's transits, 1805. 3. Corrections to the stars and the Sun to be applied due to errors of the meridian mark. 4. Mean times of the Moon's transits, 1805. 5. Aberrations in right ascension and north polar distance, 1802-1806. 6. Refractions of observations in 1806. 7. Computation of the refractions of stars observed by James Bradley. 8. Refractions of observations, 1806. 9. Reduction of observations, 1757-1759. 10. Refractions computed to the Sun's observed zenith distance, according to Bradley's rule, 1753-1760. 11. Calculations of the Moon's ascending node, 1756. 12. Stellar computations, 1806. 13. Sun's longitude, 1751. 14. Stellar computations, 1806. 15. Refraction of stars, 1751-1758. 16. Table of 'Natural sines to every degree of the quadrant'. 17. Calculations on observations of various stars, 1802-1806. 18. Calculations using John Flamsteed's stars of 1690. 19. Computed right ascensions and declinations from Flamsteed, to the beginning of 1802. 20. Deviations in right ascension, 1802-1807. 21. Precession in right ascension for reducing observations to the beginning of 1802. 22. Reduction of right ascensions of stars from Thomas Hornsby's catalogue to the beginning of 1756. 23. Reduction of transits, 1807. 24. Variations in right ascension between 1756 and 1803. 25. Finding the means of right ascensions between 1756 and 1803. 26. Mean polar distances, 1756-1803. 27. Corrections for precession in right ascensions of various stars checked by logarithms, 1807. 28. Mean obliquity of the ecliptic for the mean time of the meridian transit of Vesta, 1804-1807. 29. Dr Heinrich Olbers' observations, 1807. 30. Longitude and latitude of the minor planet Vesta, 1807. 31. Calculations of the longitude and latitude of the comet of 1807-1808. 32. Calculations of the mean times of the Moon and planets' transits, 1807-1808. 33. Apparent right ascension and declination of the comet of 1807, deduced from the fixed stars. 34. Longitude and latitude of the comet of 1807-1808, calculated from the corrected right ascension and declination. 35. Notes and rules on observational technique. 36. Calculations of the Sun's longitude and radius vector, 1807-1808. 37. Latitudes and longitudes of nine principal stars. 38. Mean times of the transits of the Moon and planets for 1809-1810. 39. Various notes and tables on nutation and precession. 40. Transit of Venus over the Sun's disc at Paris, 1761. 41. Notes on the finding of longitude at sea. 42. Mean times of the meridian transits of the Sun, Moon and planets, 1811.
1 volume.
1751–1811
66 Solutions to astronomical problems. Various rough drafts of the solution of astronomical problems. 1. Sun's apparent right ascension and declination, 1761-1764. 2. Moon's longitude and latitude, 1762-1764. 3. Tables on Jupiter's satellites with respect to their mean motion, eclipses, relative position and immersions and emersions, with notes on how to observe the satellites and use the tables. There are also copied pieces on Ole Rømer, 'Progressive Motion of Light in the Eclipses of Jupiter's Satellites', from 'Philosophical Transactions', Vol. 1, p. 409; Edmond Halley's hypothesis of Jupiter's satellites and his counter-arguments, from 'Philosophical Transactions', No. 214, November and December 1694; and James Bradley, 'Observations of Jupiter's Satellites'. 4. To find the correct time the Moon's eastern limb passed the Greenwich Meridian, 28 December 1745. 5. From an occultation of a star by the Moon observed in an unknown meridian to find the distance of that meridian from Greenwich, 1757. 6. Given longitudes and latitudes of the Sun, Moon or stars to find their right ascensions and declinations. 7. Sun's zenith distance when near the winter and summer solstice, 1756-1757. 8. Mean and apparent obliquity of the ecliptic, 1742-1770. 9. Instructions on using the lunar distance from the Sun or a fixed star to find the longitude in any unknown latitude, referred to the Greenwich Meridian. 10. Using the Sun's or stars' altitude to find the apparent time of day, 1757. 11. Bradley's instructions for observations of the transit of Venus, 1761, with a note in Charles Mason's hand. 12. Positions of major stars and calculations, 1750. 13. Notes on precession and nutation. 14. Notes on the equinox and the obliquity of the ecliptic in relation to precession and nutation. 15. Positions and differences in character of stars with reference to the Moon's place. 16. Aberration of the six principal planets, in order to convert mean to apparent longitude, written in French. 17. Various determinations of the obliquity of the ecliptic. 18. Various determinations of the Sun's elements. 19. The motion of the planets. 20. Various determinations of the Sun's apparent diameter. 21. Precession of the fixed stars. 22. Refractions. 23. Finding the annual variation of a star in right ascension and declination. 24. Errors in the transit telescope by observation and the use of a good clock. 25. Finding the aberration in right ascension, declination, latitude and longitude at any given time. 26. Table to find the true anomaly of a planet. 27. Explanations of the tables of eccentricity. 28. Various computations. 29. Epitaph on Halley's gravestone. 30. Table of aberrations in right ascension applied to the mean, giving the apparent. 31. Tables of the equations of the Sun and the Moon.
1 volume.
1694–1770
67 Stellar observations and calculations. Various observations and calculations, primarily of the stars. 1. Tables and equations for the Earth's perturbations by Venus and Jupiter and for the lunar equation. 2. Catalogue of the stars for 1690 and 1760, with elements for their aberrations. 3. Corrections for the tables of Dalembert, Halley, Mayer and Clairaut. 4. To find the aberration in right ascension and declination. 5. Comparisons with Nicholas Louis de Lacaille's star catalogue, 1750 and 1760. 6. Tables, equations and computations in respect of errors in the solar tables, 1743-1756. 7. Tables of the Moon, including parallax and diameter. 8. Moon's parallax in altitude corresponding to its true zenith distance. 9. The argument of the Moon's diameter. 10. The mean precession of stars in longitude. 11. Decimal parts of a year. 12. A table of stars for lunar distance observations, 1760. 13. Moon's hourly motion in longitude and latitude. 14. Correction of Moon's equatorial parallax. 15. Aberrations of the stars in longitude, with corrections for certain stars depending on the day of the year, 1755-1771. 16. Star corrections for 1755-1771, with a star catalogue of 1760. 17. Errors of the arc of the quadrant and in the line of collimation, with other equations, 1750-1752. 18. Calculations on precession from comparisons of John Flamsteed's observations of 1690 and observations in 1752, dated May 1758. 19. Examination of Thomas Simpson's rule for refraction, 1743, and comparisons with positions of the low stars, 1750-1753. 20. Catalogue of stars, 1758. 21. Lunar observations by James Bradley, 1743-1745. 22. Aberration and nutation corrections to various stars. 23. General equations for reducing equal altitudes of the Sun to find the time of the Sun's meridian transit. 24. Tables of the Sun's place in the ecliptic and of maximum aberrations of the stars in right ascension. 25. Star catalogue, 1760. 26. Explanation of, and tables for, the deviation of the stars in right ascension and declination, with a diagram. 27. Gael Morris's star catalogues for 1744 and 1746, with a note of Bradley's work on the nutation of the Earth's axis.
1 volume.
circa 1743-circa 1771
68 Effect of Jupiter and Venus on the Sun. Computations on the effect of Jupiter and Venus on the Sun's place. 1. Computations on the inequality of the Earth, produced by Jupiter and Venus, on Johann Mayer's theoretical position compared with two sets of observations, 7 June 1745 - 29 December 1751 and 4 May 1751 - 22 March 1756. 2. New errors in the solar table, 14 January 1743 - 25 April 1756. 3. Corrections to the places of the Sun's apogee by observations near the apogee and perigee. 4. Tables for the equation of the Sun's centre and calculations of the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, with tables. 5. The maximum of the equations of Jupiter and Venus determined. There is also the maximum of the lunar equation that disturbs the Sun's motion, 1743-1756. 6. New errors in the solar table for determining the lunar equation, 1743-1756. 7. The maximum of Jupiter's equation determined from errors of the solar tables, 1743-1755. 8. The maximum of Venus' equation determined from errors of the solar tables, 1743-1755. 9. Arguments of the two small equations affecting the Sun's place. 10. Annual results and observations of the solar equation, 1744-1755. 11. Tables for finding the Sun's anomaly for every day of the year.
1 volume.
1743–1756
69 Stellar catalogue. Catalogue of stars giving mean right ascensions, north polar distances, longitudes and latitudes, and annual precession.
1 volume.
1760
70 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations by Reuben Burrows of the Moon's longitude and latitude from Johann Mayer's tables and from observed right ascension and north polar distance, 28 May 1758 and 5 September 1762 to 15 November 1763.
1 volume.
1758–1763
71 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's place from observed right ascension and declination and from Johann Mayer's tables, 30 August - 27 December 1762, compiled by Reuben Burrows. There volume also includes computations for the mean time of the transits of Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Venus and Mercury.
1 volume.
1762–1765
72 Computation of the Sun's place. Computations relating to the Sun, including those on the Sun's place using Johann Mayer's tables, 11 May 1765 - 29 April 1766, with reference to the obliquity of the ecliptic. There are calculations of the mean time of the transit of the Moon between 31 May 1765 and 28 April 1766, and on the Moon's longitude and latitude using Mayer's tables, 31 May - 19 November 1765. The calculations were made by William Bayly.
1 volume.
1765–1766
73 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and declination and from Johann Mayer's tables, 31 May 1765 - 22 December 1766.
1 volume.
1765–1766
74 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's tabular longitude and latitude from Johann Mayer's tables and the 'Nautical Almanac', compared with observations throughout 1771. There are also mean times of the transits of Saturn, Jupiter, Mars and Venus during 1771.
1 volume.
circa 1771
75 Observations of the Moon compared. Observations of the Moon compared with the results of Johann Mayer's tables, 28 August 1762 - 29 December 1771.
1 volume.
1762–1771
76 Transits of the Moon, Saturn and Mars. Mean times of transits of the Moon, Saturn and Mars in 1772, and the computation of the Moon's longitude and latitude derived from tables and from observed right ascension and north polar distance, 8 January - 23 September 1772.
1 volume.
1772
77 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from tables and from observed right ascension and north polar distance, 5 October - 21 November 1772.
1 volume.
1772
78 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's tabular longitude and latitude from Johann Mayer's tables and from observed right ascension and declination, 3 October - 31 December 1773.
1 volume.
1773
79 Moon's observed place. The Moon's observed right ascension, declination, longitude and latitude compared with Johann Mayer's tables, 8 January 1772 - 30 December 1776, and with Charles Mason's tables, 1 January 1777 - 30 December 1782.
1 volume.
1772–1782
80 Moon's observed place. Calculations and arguments for computing the Moon's tabular place, 13 September 1750 - 31 December 1759, with many calculations apparently on lunar equations. There are also tables on the longitude equations of the Moon, 29 September 1759 - 2 November 1760, and the latitude equations of the Moon, 1 January - 2 November 1760, calculated by Charles Mason.
1 volume.
1750–1760
81 Moon's observed place. Comparison of the Moon's observed place with the tabular place from two sets of tables calculated by Charles Mason, 8 January 1751 - 31 December 1759.
1 volume.
1751–1759
82 Moon's longitude. The Moon's longitude deduced from Charles Mason's tables of 1776, and compared with observed longitude, 8 January 1750 - 31 December 1759. There are also tables of the Moon and Sun's positions, 13 September 1750 - 2 November 1760, and abstracts of errors of Mason's lunar tables, 1750-1752.
1 volume.
1750–1760
83 Computation of Moon's place. Computations by Charles Mason of the Moon's tabular longitude and comparison with observed longitude, 13 September 1750 - 2 November 1760, with remarks on how the computations were arrived at.
1 volume.
1753–1760
84 Mason's lunar tables. Part of the computations of Charles Mason's lunar tables of 1778, including comparisons of the tables of the Moon in longitude and latitude, with observations. The volume includes tables on the annual equation of the anomaly and ascending node of the Moon, details of the Moon's longitude, corrections and reductions. There are computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude as compared to Johann Mayer's tables, 1751-1760; computed longitude of the Moon compared with observed longitude, 1750-1760; and remarks on this subject given to the Board of Longitude, 1750-1760. There are also Mason's equations of the computed latitude of the Moon that differs from the observed, 1750-1760.
1 volume.
1750–1778
85 Lunar computations. Lunar computations for Charles Mason's new tables of 1772, covering the period 13 September 1750 to 31 December 1759. There are remarks on the accuracy of the observations and computations.
1 volume.
1750–1772
86 Lunar tables. Lunar tables in longitude and latitude according to the Newtonian law of gravity, by Charles Mason, 1778. The volume includes a disapproval of Mason's fee from the Board of Longitude; an example of computing the Moon's longitude and latitude; annual equations of the Moon's anomaly and ascending node; and computed longitude and latitude compared with observed longitude and latitude, with corrections, 13 September 1750 - 2 November 1760.
1 volume.
1750–1778
87 Computations for the Sun and Moon. Incomplete computations from the 1778 lunar tables, 31 May 1765 - 2 December 1766 (2 copies). In the 1778 tables there are also the epochs of the Sun and the Moon for 1762-1768 and computations of the Moon's longitude for the year 1768.
1 volume.
1762–1778
88 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observations and from Johann Mayer's tables, 4 January - 30 December 1770. The volume includes the mean times for the Moon's transits, 4 January - 30 December 1770, and the conversion of mean times into apparent times, 1767-1770.
1 volume.
1767–1770
89 Computation of the Moon's place. Calculation of the Moon's tabular longitude and latitude from Johann Mayer's tables, compared with longitude and latitude computed from observations, 17 November 1763 - 2 March 1765. There is also the interpolation of the Moon's longitude and latitude from the 'Nautical Almanac', 10 January 1767 - 30 December 1770.
1 volume.
1767–1770
90 Computation of the Moon's place. Three volumes bound together of computations of the Moon's tabular longitude and latitude (apparently calculated from Johann Mayer's tables) compared with longitude and latitude from observations, 1 January 1775 - 30 December 1776, and a similar volume for 6 January - 29 December 1775. There are also computations of mean times of the Moon's meridian transit throughout 1776.
1 volume.
1774–1776
91 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude, reduced from observations, compared to longitude and latitude interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 7 January 1777 - 28 December 1782.
1 volume.
1777–1782
92 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, including the mean obliquity of the ecliptic, compared with longitude and latitude interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 9 January 1783 - 4 July 1784 and 12 February 1786.
1 volume.
1783–1786
93 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with places interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 5 July 1784 - 9 February 1786. The volume includes observations of the Moon performed by John Brinkley, 24 March 1785 - 9 February 1786.
1 volume.
1784–1786
94 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with longitude and latitude interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 10 February 1786 - 28 August 1787. There is a note on how to find the mean time answering to sidereal time using the tables, and columns on the mean obliquity of the ecliptic.
1 volume.
1786–1787
95 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with longitude and latitude interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 30 August 1787 - 7 June 1789, and with the mean obliquity of the ecliptic for 1787.
1 volume.
1787–1789
96 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with longitude and latitude interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 10 June 1789 - 8 August 1792.
1 volume.
1789–1792
97 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with longitude and latitude interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 12 August 1792 - 25 October 1795.
1 volume.
1792–1795
98 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observations, compared with places in the 'Nautical Almanac', 26 October 1795 - 14 November 1798.
1 volume.
1795–1798
99 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with places interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 15 November 1798 - 23 October 1801.
1 volume.
1798–1801
100 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with places interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 24 October 1801 - 16 September 1804.
1 volume.
1801–1804
101 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with places interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 19 September 1804 - 16 March 1808.
1 volume.
1804–1808
102 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and north polar distance, compared with places interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac', 3 April 1808 - 11 April 1811.
1 volume.
1808–1811
103 Observations of the Moon's place. The Moon's observed right ascension, declination, longitude and latitude compared with Charles Mason's first lunar tables, 9 January 1783 - 21 December 1788, and with Mason's second lunar tables, 2 January 1789 - 8 October 1794.
1 volume.
1783–1794
104 Observations of the Moon's place. The Moon's observed right ascension, declination, longitude and latitude compared with Charles Mason's second lunar tables, 11 October 1794 - 31 December 1800.
1 volume.
1794–1800
105 Computation of the Moon's place. Computations of the Moon's longitude and latitude from observed right ascension and declination, compared with places interpolated from the 'Nautical Almanac' for various observations between 3 July 1775 and 29 June 1785.
1 volume.
1775–1785
106 French tables of the Moon. The French tables of the Moon. 1. Logarithms of terrestrial radius. 2. Horizontal diameter of the Moon and increase of the horizontal semi-diameter of the Moon. 3. Hourly movement in longitude of the Moon and equations of the second order. 4. Hourly movements in latitude of the Moon and equations of the second order, with a subsidiary table to complete equations XXXXI and XXII. 5. Hourly movement in longitude of the Moon: equations of the second order and arguments of longitude. 6. Horizontal equatorial parallax, including logarithms of the terrestrial radius. 7. Tables for the equatorial parallax. 8. Tables for the latitude of the Moon. 9. Equations of the latitude. 10. Equations of the variation of the longitude. 11. Nutation. 12. Equations of longitude. 13. Equation to correct the increase in the node. 14. Equation to correct the mean average anomaly of the Moon. 15. Equation of the orbit of the Moon. 16. First annual equation of longitude. 17. Equations of longitude or evection. 18. Mean motion of the Moon, its anomaly, and the increase of its node in minutes and seconds. 19. Mean motion of the Moon, its anomaly and the increase of its node for each day of the month. 20. Mean motion of the Moon, its anomaly and the increase of its node for each hour. 21. Epochs of mean longitude of the Moon, its anomaly, and of the increase of its node for the meridian of Paris.
1 envelope.
circa 1800
107 Dividing astronomical instruments. John Bird, 'The method of dividing astronomical instruments', dealing primarily with dividing the quadrant, sworn before and signed by Hawke and Storie, 21 March 1767. (MISSING).
1 volume.
1767
108 Lunar theory and the Newtonian system. 'Lunar theory in conjunction with the Newtonian system.' The work includes Johann Mayer's tables, preparation and reduction of the equations, workings in infinitesimal calculus, the solar parallaxes and the Moon's longitude.
1 envelope.
circa 1760
109 Positions of places in the East Indies. List of longitudes and latitudes of places in the East Indies calculated by Peter Heywood for the Board of Longitude. There is also a covering letter to Maskelyne, 21 November c. 1805.
1 volume.
1800–1808
110 Longitude of Stroud. A single sheet of paper concerning the longitude of Stroud, Gloucestershire, 17 May 1758.
1 envelope.
1758
111 Treatises by Captain Muller. Two treatises by Captain William Muller, Royal German Engineers, 'on the publishing of a Naval and Military Atlas of the coasts of Europe' and 'on a projection for maps and charts'.
1 volume.
circa 1774
112 Measurement of a meridional arc. Measurement of a meridional arc from Trivandeporum to Paudree, India, and of the arc perpendicular to the meridian. The volume includes accounts, observations and experiments performed by Brigade Major William Lambton on the latitude 12º32'N. 1. An account of the measurement of the base line and an explanation and experiments performed on the chain and their comparative lengths. 2. Commencement of the operations from the base: the large theodolite. 3. Angles taken with the large theodolite, 27 September 1802 - 13 April 1803. 4. Triangles. 5. Reduction of the distances to the meridian of Trivandeporum for determining the length of the terrestrial arc. 6. Observations with the zenith sector for the latitude of Paudra. 7. Observations of the Pole Star and the length of a degree perpendicular to the meridian. 8. Size of the Earth deduced from the data and a map of the meridians used. 9. Postscript.
1 volume.
1800–1803
113 Measurement of a meridional arc. Measurement by Brigade Major William Lambton of the meridional arc from Puchapollian to Paughur and of the arc perpendicular to the meridian. 1. Measurements of an arc extending from latitude 10º59'50".14 to 13º59'51".62 and the measurement of an arc perpendicular to the meridian in latitude 12º55'10".24. i. The meridional arc. ii. Experiments made for comparing the chains previous to the experiment. iii. Tables containing the particulars of measurements. iv. Angles. v. Principal triangles from which the meridional arc is derived. vi. Measurement of the base line in the Coimbetoor. vii. Details of the measurements. viii. Observations and tests with the triangles. ix. Pole Star observations at Dodagoontah. x. Reduction of the distances to the meridians of Dodagoontah and the lengths of the terrestrial arcs. 2. Zenith distances of the stars, with the correction for precession, nutation, aberration and the semi-annual solar equations, the observations undertaken at Paughur, Dodagoontah, Puchapollian and Bomasundrum. 3. Means of the zenith distances taken on the right and left arcs at Paughur, Dodagoontah, Puchapollian and Bomasundrum corrected for refraction. There are also equations of the sectorial tube, notes on the micrometer, the latitude of Dodagoontah Station, the amplitudes of the arcs and the celestial arc between the parallel. 4. Material chiefly on the perpendicular arcs, comprising angles, principal triangles from which the perpendicular arcs are derived, the latitude of Savendroog Station, the arc comprehended by the meridians of Savendroog and Mullapunnabetta, and the arc comprehended by the meridians of Savendroog and Yerracondah, with a plan of the meridians used.
1 volume.
1805
114 Measurement of the Bangalore baseline. An account by Brigade Major William Lambton of the measurement of a base line near Bangalore, together with the particulars of a geographical survey around Mysore. The book is divided into two parts. The first section is comprised of an account of the measurement of the base line near Bangalore and descriptions of the instruments used to determine the latitude and meridian lines for taking the horizontal angles. The second part is an account of the principal operation of the survey, with an explanation of the procedure involved. There are tables for the observations at the latitudes of Seringapatum, Shettagay and Serah, and distances from the meridians of various places, with their deduced latitudes and longitudes.
1 volume.
1800–1801
115 Rules for the attraction of hills. 'Mr Cavendish's Rules for calculating the attraction of hills', a collection of equations and formulae, with sketches.
1 envelope.
circa 1770
116 Rules for the attraction of hills on plumb-lines. 'Mr Cavendish's Rules for computing the attraction of mountains on plumb-lines: also part of a copy of a letter on the same subject given to Dr Franklin in order for his correspondent in America to give information of any mountains or valleys that may be found proper for making the experiment.' There are sketches and equations illustrating the hypothesis.
1 volume.
circa 1770
117 Number unassigned.
118 Meridian transits. Unbound proof sheets of James Bradley's observed transits of the Sun, planets and fixed stars over the meridian, 5 January 1756 - 16 July 1762, and observed meridional distances of the fixed stars and planets from the zenith, 7 January 1756 - 13 October 1783. The proof sheets were calculated and corrected by Abram Robertson at Oxford, 1800-1802.
1 volume.
1756–1802
119 Correspondence on Vesta and Ceres. Letters to Maskelyne and related papers on the minor planet Ceres. i. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, Germany, 20 February 1802, on ephemeris of Ceres, March-April 1802. ii. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, Germany, 3 April 1802, on ephemeris of Ceres, 21 April - 29 June 1802. iii. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, Germany, 30 January 1803, thanking Maskelyne for his present of Taylor's tables and giving corrections to the observed position of Ceres. iv. Geocentric motion of Ceres, 4 February - 9 August 1803. v. Stephen Lee's observations of Ceres at Hackney, London, 8 February 1802. vi. Letter from George Gilpin, Somerset, 4 February 1802, containing observations of Ceres by Baron Francis von Zach. vii. Observations of Ceres by A. Aubert, Austin Friars, 9 February 1802. viii. Letter from Baron von Zach, Seeberg Observatory, Gotha, Germany, 15 March 1802, on the minor planet Ceres, including an ephemeris, stars observed with the planet, discoveries in Australia, a new duplicating process and errors in Burg's new lunar tables. ix. Letter to Sir Joseph Banks from Baron von Zach, Seeburg, Germany, 30 March 1802, containing elements of Ceres and a star catalogue. There are descriptions of Ceres, information on the clandestine Austrian printer and Leonhard Euler's chess problem. x. Letter from Baron von Zach, Seeberg Observatory, near Gotha, Germany, 4 May 1802, containing notes on the faults of his telescope and references to Ceres in his scientific journal.
1 envelope.
1789–1807
120 Correspondence on Ceres. Loose letters, printed matter, calculations and sketches of Ceres. i. Calculations, apparently for determining the elements of Ceres' orbit. ii. Geocentric motion of Ceres, 1801-1803. iii. Printed German account of Giuseppe Piazzi's discovery of Ceres, complete with ephemeris, relative positions of the planets, chart and corrections to the observations, 1801. iv. Maskelyne's account and details of the minor planet Ceres, 17 February 1802. v. Calculations pertaining to the position of Ceres, 1801. vi. French account of the position and elements of Ceres during 1801-1802, dated 24 January 1802, author unknown. vii. Notes on the observations of Ceres during 1801-1802, dated 23 February 1802. viii. Details of the position and motion of Ceres, 1801-1802. ix. Baron von Zach's formula for calculating the place of Ceres. x. French observations of Ceres, 1801-1802. xi. Calculations and observations of Ceres, with a table of Zach's, Olbers' and Mechain's observations, 1801-1802. xii. Algebraic formula to calculate Ceres's position, written on the reverse of a Royal Society invitation, 7 February 1802. xiii. Notes and calculations on the wires in the telescope, 18 November 1801. xiv. Orbit of Ceres. xv. Calculations and elements of the orbit of Ceres, written on a note from John Banks of 28 January 1802 stating his observations of Ceres. xvi. Ceres' position, 18 March - 6 April 1802. xvii. Various calculations on Ceres' position. xviii. Calculations ascertaining Ceres' position and its geocentric longitude, 1800-1802. xix. Algebra and calculations for computing Ceres' position. xx. Tables of observed and calculated geocentric longitude and latitude of Ceres, its mean time, right ascension and declination, with the longitude of the Sun and the logarithms of its distance from the Earth, 1801. xxi. Table of observations of Ceres, with notes on position and observational technique, 16 September 1801 - 12 April 1802. xxii. Calculations for the latitude and longitude of Ceres from the observed right ascension and declination, 4 February - 23 July 1802. xxiii. Observations of Ceres in the Eastern Dome, 23 October 1801. xxiv. Notes by Baron von Zach on the characteristics of Ceres, with its position, 20 June - 8 November 1801. MISSING. xxv. Rough calculations on Ceres. xxvi. Position and calculation of the 1807 comet with relation to the places of various major stars, 1801-1807. xxvii. Catalogue of stars in the path of the new planet, and Baron von Zach's corrected position of the Moon, 1789-1802.
1 envelope.
1802–1803
121 Correspondence on Vesta. Loose papers on the minor planet Vesta. i. Observations by Dr Olbers at Bremen, 29 March - 4 May 1807, and an account of Vesta's position. ii. Position of Vesta, 27 April - 28 June 1807, on the reverse of a letter from Francis Maseres. iii. Various calculations, apparently concerned with Vesta's position. iv. Right ascension and calculations on the planet Vesta. v. Vesta observed on the meridian, 11 April - 23 May 1807. vi. Observations of Vesta in the Eastern and Western Domes, 18 April - 28 June 1807.
1 envelope.
1807
122 Correspondence on Pallas and Ceres. Various correspondence on Pallas and Ceres. 1. Letter postscript by Dr Gauss, 7 April 1802, regarding the discovery of the asteroid Pallas by Dr Olbers. 2. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 19 May 1802, containing further information and ephemeris of the asteroid Pallas. 3. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 30 July 1802, containing ephemeris of the asteroid Pallas and details of its position. 4. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 18 November 1802, on the position and geocentric motion of Pallas for 1803. 5. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 24 April 1803, on elements and ephemeris for Pallas during 1803. 6. Letter to Sir Joseph Banks from Baron von Zach, Seeberg Observatory, Gotha, 31 May 1802, containing elements, ephemeris and orbit of Pallas compared with Ceres, and an ephemeris of Ceres for 1802. . 7. Letter to Sir Joseph Banks from Baron Zach, Seeberg Observatory, Gotha, 5 April 1802, announcing the discovery of a new planet (Pallas) by Dr Olbers, and giving its position and other observations of Ceres.
1 envelope.
1802–1803
123 Papers on Pallas and Ceres. Various loose papers relating to the discovery of Pallas and Ceres. 1. Rough calculations of Pallas, 1803. 2. Rough calculations of Ceres, 1803. 3. Other calculations of Pallas written on a Royal Society invitation, 1803. 4. Another calculation of Pallas, 1803. 5. Calculations of Pallas, 1803. 6. Observations of associated stars, 1802-1803. 7. Computations from observations of Pallas, 1802-1803. 8. Rough calculations of Pallas, 1803. 9. Account and description of Pallas and its discovery, including its elements. 10. Observations of major stars in conjunction with Pallas, 1803. 11. Rough calculations of Pallas. 12. Geocentric motion of Pallas and the 'force of light'. 13. Observed station of Pallas and calculations, 1804. 14. Rough calculations of Pallas, one on a letter from George Gilpin, 12 July 1802. 15. Rough calculations of Ceres, 1802. 16. Rough calculations of Pallas, 1802. 17. Position of Pallas on 14 July 1802, and Dr Gauss' elements for Pallas. 18. Observations of stars close to Pallas, 1802. 19. 'Mr Machain's observations of Olbers' star.'. 20. Observations of Pallas, 1802-1803. 21. Dr Gauss's elements and ephemeris, 1802. 22. Calculations of Ceres and Pallas. 23. Observations of the brightness of Ceres and Pallas, 1802. 24. Calculations of Pallas' distance from the Earth, 23 June 1802. 25. Calculations of the latitude and longitude of Pallas derived from observed right ascension and declination, 1802. 26. Observations of Pallas, 1802-1803. 27. Observations of Ceres, 1802. 28. Pallas observed with the equatorial telescope, 1802. 29. Amendments to observations of Ceres, 1802. 30. Observations of Pallas, 1802. 31. Letter from Charles Blagden, Paris, 14 April 1802, on Dr Olbers' discovery of a new planet. 32. Observed right ascension of Pallas, 1802. 33. Letter from Joseph Banks, Soho, London, 16 April 1802, on the discovery of a new planet (Pallas). 34. Letter from Stephen Lee, Hackney, 14 April 1802, describing Pallas and its position. 35. Announcement of the discovery of Pallas by Joseph Banks, Soho, London, 9 April 1802, with other calculations. 36. An account of Dr Olbers' discovery of Pallas, 21 April 1802. 37. Description of observations and the discovery of Pallas, with the technique employed, 1802. 38. Further account of the new planet Pallas. 39. On the discovery of Ceres, together with a brief resumé of the career of Dr Gauss. 40. Meridian observations of Pallas by Baron von Zach, 1802. 41. Ephemeris of Pallas and notes of observations undertaken, 1803.
1 envelope.
1802–1804
124 Papers on Juno. Letters to Maskelyne and loose papers relating to the discovery of Juno. 1. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 25 September 1804, regarding the discovery of the asteroid Juno (named here Hebe), with its elements. 2. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 16 October 1804, on the comparison between Pallas, Ceres and Juno and the elements of Juno. 3. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 7 December 1804, regarding corrected elements of Juno. 4. Letter from Dr Gauss, Brunswick, 2 April 1805, requesting Maskelyne's observations of Juno, with an ephemeris for Ceres, Pallas and Juno, 1805-1806, and their elements for 1806. 5. Details of the asteroid Juno received from Lilienthal, Germany, 11 September 1804. 6. 'Places of new planet Juno', 1804. 7. Rough calculations. 8. 'Observations and calculations of a new planet discovered by Mr Harding at Lilienthal in the Dutchy of Bremen' (i.e. the planet Juno), 1 September 1804. 9. Reduced right ascension of Juno, 1804. 10. Equations relating to Juno, 1 October 1804.
1 envelope.
1804–1806
125 Solar and lunar tables. Various solar and lunar tables, divided into four sections. 1. Solar tables, from gravitational theory and observations: i. The true longitude of the Sun in time, with the apogee in the 8th degree of Cancer, for the year 1716; ii. The true longitude of the Sun in time, with the apogee in the 9th degree of Cancer, for the year 1771; iii. Longitudes from the Greenwich Meridian of principal places, with their geographical latitudes; iv. The mean motion of the Sun, the precession of the equinox and decrease in the obliquity of the ecliptic in Julian years; v. Epochs of the Sun's motion, in mean time at the Greenwich Meridian, 600 BC - 1735 AD and 1736-1807 AD; vi. The mean motion of the Sun, tabulated in months and days; vii. The mean motion of the Sun, tabulated in hours, minutes and seconds; viii. The equation of the Sun in a hypothetical ellipse, to give the Sun's longitude; ix. The logarithmic distance from the Sun to the Earth; x. Longitudinal distances between the Earth, Moon, Jupiter and Venus, and the obliquity of the ecliptic; xi. The longitude of the Sun in relation to the Moon, Jupiter, Venus and the equinox; xii. The apparent semi-diameter of the Sun and its hourly motion; xiii. The right ascension of the ecliptic; xiv. Deviation from points in the ecliptic; xv. Astronomical refractions. 2. Lunar tables, from gravitational theory and observations: i. The mean motion of the Moon in Julian years, 600 BC - 1807 AD; ii. Mean epochs of the Moon's motion, in mean time at the Paris Meridian; iii. The mean motion of the Moon tabulated in months and days; iv. The mean motion of the Moon tabulated in hours, minutes and seconds; v. Acceleration in the mean motion of the Moon, added to its mean longitude, 900 BC - 4300 AD; vi. The mean anomaly of the Moon with reference to the longitude of the Moon; vii. Tables for the latitude of the Moon; viii. Tables of lunar parallax; ix. Tables for the longitude of the Moon; x. Tables of the Moon's longitude in time; xi. Tables of the motion of the Moon in latitude; xii. Right ascension ascertained from the ecliptic longitude; xiii. Corrected declination of the ecliptic subtracted from the ecliptic latitude; xiv. Corrected right ascension for alterations in the obliquity of the ecliptic; xv. The use of the tables of the equations of time: 13 problems, with examples and discussion. 3. Duplicates of the lunar tables in RGO 4/125 (1) and (2), mostly untitled, with various problems and solutions to the Sun's motion and position. 4.Various solar and lunar tables: i. The hourly motion in latitude of the Moon; ii. Mean epochs of the Moon's motion in mean time at the Greenwich Meridian, using the Julian and Gregorian calendars, 1580 BC - 1752 AD; iii. Mean epochs of the Sun's motion in mean time at the Greenwich Meridian.
1 folder.
1807
126 Horary tables of the Moon. Undated horary tables of the Moon's motion.
1 sheet.
127 Computation of the Sun's place. A book prepared for computation of the Sun's longitude from right ascension, 1763-1782, containing only two calculations.
1 volume.
circa 1782
128 Distances of planets from the Sun. Distances of the planets from the Sun, and the Moon from the Earth; definitions of the lunar month, tropical year and solar year; and an ellipse of one of the planets' orbits. The papers are undated. They were possibly part of an elementary treatise on the Moon and planets.
1 folder.
129 Latitude and longitude tables. Tables of longitudes and latitudes from the 'Nautical Almanac', January 1767 - June 1770, with a few tabular errors.
1 folder.
circa 1771
130 Index to some solar tables. An index to some solar tables, probably those found in RGO 4/125.
2 sheets.
circa 1807
131 Reduction of the Moon's place. Reductions of the Moon's place in comparison with tables, 1763-1771, and calculations by Mr Hollins of the Moon's transit, 1772, by George Gilpin on the Moon's places, 1768-1776, by William Bayly on the Moon, 1766-1775, and by Reuben Burrows on the Moon, 1762-1770. There are also reductions of the Moon's place, 1781-1782, and references to reduced observations, 1783-1792.
1 sheet.
1762–1792
132 Letter on Pallas. Letter from Charles Blagden, Paris, regarding Pierre-Simon Laplace's lunar theory and the minor planet Pallas.
1 sheet.
4 May 1802
133 Sun's observed longitude. The Sun's longitude by observation deduced from the observed right ascension. The pages have possibly been removed from an earlier volume.
1 folder.
1762–1773
134 Solar diameter from transit observations. The diameters of the Sun deduced from transit observations.
1 sheet.
1800–1801
135 Sun's right ascension at the summer solstice. The right ascension of the Sun at the summer solstice.
1 sheet.
1804
136 Computation of the Sun's place. Computations of the Sun's tabular longitude compared with observations.
2 sheets.
1763–1765
137 Rule for finding clock rates. Maskelyne, 'Rule for finding the rate of the clock to be used in reducing the Sun's Right Ascension from observations', and 'Rule for reducing the Moon's Right Ascension', undated.
1 sheet.
138 Letter on errors of the solar tables. A letter from Charles Mason, Tetbury, Gloucestershire, giving details of errors for the solar tables.
2 sheets.
30 Jan. 1771
139 Geocentric latitude of Mars. Computations of the geocentric latitude of Mars and an examination of John Flamsteed's observations by Howe and Maskelyne.
1 volume.
1769
140 Calculations in trigonometry and central forces. Various loose calculations, equations and diagrams, including a paper on elementary trigonometry and central forces, an unfinished table on the deviation of the stars in north polar distance common to all stars, star charts of the Pleiades, observations of principal stars and calculations using Lacaille's tables.
1 folder.
1748–1789
141 Papers on Bradley's observations. Papers relating to the reduction of James Bradley's observations. These include notes on transit and quadrant observations; notes on observational technique, 1750-1755; observations of Alpha Aquilae and Alpha Orionis, 1751-1758; longitude of the Sun, 1746-1750; right ascension of Alpha Aquilae, 1753-1756; Moon's transits, 1751-1759; north polar distance of stars calculated by Charles Mason from observed zenith distances, 1753-1756; summary of calculations to be made on Bradley's observations; comparison of Arcturus with nearby stars; and various observations and calculations made with the quadrant, in tabular form, 1750-1755.
1 folder.
1746–1759
142 Observations and calculations. Various papers dealing with observations and calculations. 1. Errors of the equatorial circle and the meridian circle in the Eastern Dome, and other notes relating to the equatorial telescope, 1799. 2. The problem of predicting, from past observations, the position of a comet for several days in the future, undated. 3. 'Scheme and rule to find longitude and latitude in the second semi-circle of right ascension.'. 4. The 'St James's Chronicle' newspaper, 21 May 1807, announcing the discovery of a new planet, probably Vesta, and the election of Lord Cochrane and the radical Sir Francis Burdett. 5. Observations of major stars, 29 May - 2 June 1756. 6. Various calculations and formulae. 7. Details relating to the equatorial sectors.
1 volume.
circa 1756-circa 1807
143 Adjustment of quadrant plumb-line. An estimation of the possible accuracy of adjustment to the plumb-line of the quadrant, with an untitled calculation.
1 sheet.
1802
144 Tabular place of Mars. A comparison of observed and tabular places of the planet Mars, 11 October - 8 November 1768.
2 sheets.
1768
145 Stellar catalogue. A Latin star catalogue giving the longitudes and latitudes of the principal stars, 1760; extracts of dates of James Bradley's observations with the mural quadrant; observations of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, 1750-1755; and a letter from J. Williams, Mile End, London, 11 November 1801, requesting clarification of some ambiguous elements, with a calculation on the ellipse on the reverse.
1 folder.
1750–1801
146 Observations of transit of Venus. Errors of tabular places of Venus, 1765 and 1769, and a letter from Maskelyne requesting the observations of the transit of Venus as observed from Edinburgh, 20 June 1769.
1 folder.
1765–1769
147 Observations of Flamsteed and Bradley. Examination of John Flamsteed and James Bradley's observations, primarily by John Howe. 1. Distances from the Pole Star to the Pole based on observations by Tycho Brahe in 1583 and by Flamsteed in 1690, compiled by Howe, 31 May 1708. 2. The precession of the equinox inferred from Flamsteed's 1690 observations, compiled by Howe, 13 December 1770. 3. Apparent right ascension of the star Alpha Aquilae, 1753-1756, and other stars. 4. A star catalogue showing proper motions of the stars. 5. Investigations into measurements made by Tycho Brahe, c. 1583, making allowance for errors, refraction and aberration, computed by Howe, 8 April 1767. . 6. Right ascensions of various stars, 1 January 1758. 7. Comparison of Howe's tables of the Sun with Bradley's observations, 1743-1759, and also the motion of the Sun, 1764. 8. Zenith distances cleared of errors from refractions, 1753-1754. 9. Solstitial zenith distance of the Sun, reduced and corrected. 10. Right ascension of the star Alpha Aquilae, 1753-1754, and the proper motions of stars, 1767. 11. Errors in the equation of the Sun caused by Venus. 12. Various notes on other astronomers' observations, with a list of stars with peculiar motions. 13. Differences in star positions between Flamsteed and Bradley's observations. 14. Corrections to Flamsteed's stars; Rømer's star catalogue, 1706 (the Triduum); and observational technique. 15. Errors of Flamsteed's mural quadrant; right ascension of the Sun, 1690; and corrections and verification of previous observations. 16. Chronology of observations performed by Howe and Bradley. 17. 'To find longitude at sea', various methods suggested by Thomas Hazelden of Wapping in a letter to James Hodgson, 28 August 1728.
1 folder.
circa 1690-circa 1770
148 Star catalogues. Various star catalogues compiled by Maskelyne from James Bradley's observations, and computations of the proper motions of some stars.
1 folder.
1743–1789
149 Letters from Maskelyne to Henry Andrews. Letters, primarily from Maskelyne to Henry Andrews, concerning:. 1. A request for lunar and solar places for December 1770, 27 February 1768. 2. Sun's right ascension and declination, 13 August 1787. 3. Longitudes of the stars from Johann Mayer's and Charles Mason's tables, 16 July 1787. 4. The details of the expected 1790 comet, 22 December 1788. 5. A request for computations for the 1800 'Nautical Almanac', 5 December 1789. 6. On an unbound set of logarithms, 7 March 1793. 7. Notice that calculations are soon to be halted on the 'Nautical Almanac' for 1804, 15 August 1793. 8. Proposals to recalculate previous predictions in the 'Nautical Almanac', and to begin with Jupiter's satellites, 14 December 1793. 9. Methods of calculation and corrections to previous publications, 25 February 1794. 10. The elements for a solar eclipse, 26 February 1794. 11. Settlement of payments for computations, 27 March 1794. 12. Continuation of work on Jupiter's satellites and details of payment for work done, 9 December 1795. 13. Monies owed to Andrews, 7 February 1797. 14. Instructions in the method of computation for the 1805 'Nautical Almanac', 4 January 1798. 15. Request to calculate the Moon's place for February 1805 using Lalande's new tables, 8 March 1798. 16. Request to calculate the Sun's longitude for 1805, 2 October 1798. 17. Instructions concerning the new tables, 11 October 1798. 18. Corrections to the 1805 calculations of the Moon's longitude, 6 February 1800. 19. Request for Andrews to correct his calculations, 17 March 1800. 20. Moon's longitude and anomaly for 1806, 28 April 1801. 21. Instructions to compute the Moon's place for 1808, 15 September 1801. 22. Payment for previous work, 27 April 1802. 23. Commencement of the 1809 'Nautical Almanac', 7 June 1803. 24. Arrangement for contacting Maskelyne, 5 October 1803. 25. Notes on the use of the French tables and directions for computing the Sun's longitude, 24 October 1806. 26. Instructions in the method to be used in computations, 12 November 1806. 27. Offer of a trial in the post of 'comparer' in Mr Hitchin's place, 17 May 1809. 28. Moon's longitude and latitude and the ephemeris for 1814-1815, 6 June 1809. 29. Moon's longitude and latitude in 1814, 20 June 1809. 30. Notes on the publication of the 1814 'Nautical Almanac', 10 August 1809. 31. An outline of Maskelyne's method of computing star occultations and solar eclipses and the current state of printing of the 1814 'Nautical Almanac', 15 August 1809. 32. Calculations concerned with the planet Mars, 19 August 1809. 33. An error in the tables and corrections needed for the 'Nautical Almanac', 1813-1815, 16 September 1809. 34. Method for computing the geocentric places of the planets, 22 September 1809. 35. Settlement of monies owed to Andrews, 29 December 1809. 36. Instructions on computations for the phenomena of Jupiter's satellites, 2 January 1810. 37. Testing of A. Thatcher's rules on star positions, 27 February 1810. 38. Rules and cases for calculating latitude and for measuring longitude, to give lunar distances, March 1810. 39. A covering letter for a celestial globe recently sent to Andrews, 19 March 1810. 40. Rules for computing the lunar distance, with examples, noting that Andrews is pleased with the globe mentioned above, 26 March 1810. 41. Directions for computing the planets' positions, 1810. 42. Part of a method for calculating a solar eclipse, 24 July 1810. 43. Notes on the publication of the 1814 'Nautical Almanac' and eclipses for 1815, 21 September 1810. 44. An account of monies owed to Andrews, 6 October 1810. 45. Order confirming payment to Andrews, 11 October 1810. 46. Adjustments to be made to calculations, 17 October 1810. 47. Letter regarding William Dunkin's enquiry on computing solar eclipses, 19 November 1810. 48. Johann Mayer's method of computing solar eclipses. 49. Maskelyne's last rule to compute the distance of the Moon from a star by spherical trigonometry, 22 March 1810. 50. Endorsement of Mayer's method in calculating solar eclipses, 5 January 1811. 51. Notification that Maskelyne is very ill, from his daughter Margaret Maskelyne, 7 February 1811. 52. Enquiry from Margaret Maskelyne over the amount due to Andrews, 6 March 1811. 53. Payment of £7 0s 2d by Margaret Maskelyne, 8 March 1811.
1 volume.
1768–1811
150 Journal of voyage to St Helena. 'Journal of a voyage from England to St Helena, Ship Prince Henry, East India Man, Charles Haggis, Commander' - a series of calculations and a log for 21 January to 6 April 1761. There are also numerous equations and algebraic formulae; a problem on the elliptical orbit of a body, with sketches and equations; and work on the scholium problem.
1 volume.
1761
151 Transit telescope observations. Transit telescope observations made using 5 horizontal wires and 3 oblique wires, 16 January to 6 August, year unknown.
1 bundle.
152 Notes on Harrison's timekeeper. 'Notes taken at the discovery of Mr Harrison's time-keeper' - observations on the accuracy of John Harrison's clock, made on a voyage to Barbados, 1765, and including the method employed to examine the clock, its efficiency and areas which could be improved.
1 envelope.
1765
153 Account of Maskelyne's chronometer. 'Account of the going of Dr Maskelyne's new Chronometer N 309 made by Mr J Earnshaw', 1 February 1800 - 10 April 1811, and material on the trials of Dr Postlethwaite's clock, 12 August - 30 September 1799.
1 volume.
1799–1811
154 Comparison of chronometers. A comparison of Arnold, Kendall and Grignion's chronometers, 30 May - 26 September c. 1772, on board the ship 'Carcass'.
1 envelope.
circa 1772
155 Journal of voyage from Bengal. 'Abstract of a Jurnal in the Ship Valintine by Mr Robert Ker, Chife Meat, from England towards Bengal and from Bengal to England - In the Hon'ble East India Company Service. In the years 1768 and 1769.' The volume is concerned principally with the latitude and longitude of the Moon.
1 volume.
1768–1769
156 Journal of voyage to Bombay. 'Abstract of a Jurnal in the Ship "Speaker" by Capt Scott from England towards Bombay and from Bombay to England in the years 1769 and 1770 - In the Hon'ble East India Company Service.' The volume is concerned principally with the latitude and longitude of the Moon.
1 volume.
1769–1770
157 Journal of voyage to Java Head. 'Abstract of a Jurnal from England towards Java Head and from Java Head to England in the ship "Duke of Gloucester" by Capt John Loudor - In the Hon'ble East India Company Service. In the years 1768 and 1769.' The volume is concerned principally with the latitude and longitude of the Moon.
1 volume.
1768–1769
158 Journal of voyage to Bombay. 'Abstract of a Jurnal in the "Prince of Wales" from England to Bombay by Mr John Kidd, Chief Meat, in the Hon'ble East India Company Service - In the year 1769 Long'd computed by Mr Lock's Methoud.' The volume is concerned principally with the latitude and longitude of the Moon.
1 volume.
1769
159 Determination of latitude and longitude. Papers concerned with determining longitude and latitude at sea, with miscellaneous observations. 1. Observations from Peking of the total lunar eclipse of 11 October 1772 and the solar eclipse of 23 March 1773, written in Latin. 2. Observations of occultations and eclipses of Jupiter's satellites and lunar distances, 1772-1774, made at the Jesuit College, Peking, China; written in Latin. 3. 'Observations made at Danes Island: 41" in time E of the Factory at Canton' of the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites, 1787-1788. 4. 'Second draft report of the astronomical observations made at St Andrews Town in Passamaquoddy Bay, in order to determine the latitude and longitude of the mouths of the rivers Scoodiac and Magaguadaweek, the two rivers in question known as the true St Croix', dated Prince Edward Island, 6 June 1799. The observations were performed by Thomas Wright and Samuel Webber on behalf of the British and American governments and were based on the immersions and emersions of Jupiter's satellites, with observed lunar distances. . 5. A note on the transit of Mercury of 9 November 1802 as observed at Paris, written in French and dated London, 4 January 1803. The note refers to comments by Charles Messier and Pierre Mechain. 6. Observations of a lunar eclipse, 26 January 1804, and a solar eclipse at Fez, Morocco, 11 February 1804, written in French. 7. The altitude of the pole from the city of Gorizia, with diagrams, written in Italian by Giangiuseppe Barzellini and dated Gorizia, Italy, 7 August 1774. 8. Observation of a meteor seen at Blackheath Hill near Greenwich, 31 July 1794. 9. Table of variations of barometric height and temperature at Madras, 1796-1803, by J. Goldenham. 10. Table of weather conditions at an unknown location giving details of temperature, barometric pressure and wind direction for each month from September 1786 to September 1787, with a general summation.
1 bundle.
1772–1804
160 Astronomical and nautical tables. Astronomical and nautical tables calculated for the meridian of Paris, extracted from Lalande's 'Connaissance des Temps' for 1762. The list of tables is in French. 1. Table of times to reduce parts of the equator. 2. Right ascension table for the adjustment of differences in degrees when the clock is too fast or to add on when the clock is too slow. . 3. Deduction table to obtain more exact passages of the stars on the meridian. 4. Conversion table of average or true positions of the brightest stars, with their average position in 1750 and the change after 10 years. 5. Precession tables for every other five days. 6. Semi-diameter of the Moon in time, supposing it to be in the equator. 7. Table to interpolate the semi-diameter of the Moon in time, depending on the degrees of declination. 8. Deviation of the horizontal line of a quadrant. 9. General equation of the Sun, 1st part. 10. General equation of the Sun, 2nd part. 11. Table of time intervals for high tide before or after the passage of the Moon on the meridian. 12. Table of meridian differences in hours and degrees between the Royal Observatory of Paris and the principle places on the Earth, with their latitudes and polar distances.
1 volume.
1762
161 Sun's place at the Greenwich meridian. Calculations of the Sun's longitude for 2 January to 26 December 1796, with a few dates between 1768 and 1778 referred to the Greenwich meridian.
1 volume.
circa 1796
162 Mean times of meridian transits. Calculations of the mean times of the Moon and planets passing the meridian, 26 January 1776 - 29 December 1785.
1 envelope.
1776–1785
163 Computation of Moon transit times. Computations of the mean times of the Moon's transit, 3 January 1786 - 30 December 1797.
1 envelope.
1786–1797
164 Tables and computations. Tables and computations, including a table for finding the Moon's southing. There is also a computation of the longitude of Calcutta, India, made from simultaneous observations there by Captain Huddart and at Greenwich of the immersions and emersions of Jupiter's satellites, 1787-1788.
1 envelope.
1787–1788
165 Astronomical tables. A book of astronomical tables, possibly used by Maskelyne in preparing his 'British Mariners Guide' (1763), containing:. 1. Rules to find when there will be an eclipse of the Sun or Moon. 2. To find the time of the new Moon, first quarter, full Moon and last quarter, with examples. 3. Table for the correction of the Moon's diameter. 4. Table to reduce sidereal time into mean solar time. 5. Right ascensions, north polar distances, latitudes and longitudes of major stars. 6. Aberrations of fixed stars in right ascension and declination. 7. To find the true geocentric appearances of the satellites of Saturn. 8. Magnifying powers of the telescopes. 9. Rule to extract the cube root of a given number. 10. Notes on spherical trigonometry for application in finding the elongation of planets.
1 volume.
1706–1762
166 Papers on observational methods. Papers on observational methods and instructions. 1. Precautions for accuracy in astronomical observations: 27 rules. 2. Preparations for observing the Sun: 10 points. 3. Directions for preparing the meridian and quadrant instruments for observing the Sun. 4. Twelve points for observing with the mural quadrant. 5. 'A method of observing with the mural quadrant by both the sub-divisions, viz. that greater and that less than the truth.'. 6. 'Problem: to find a meridian by a theodolite' (2 copies). 7. 'Astronomical rules and useful particulars of directions for observers.'. 8. Experiments to be made in observing Jupiter's satellites, with adjustments and improvements to be adapted to the telescope for that specific purpose.
1 envelope.
1777–1807
167 Papers on computing and observational methods. Papers relating to computing, observational method and instructions. 1. 'To find the variation of the declination of the Moon between the transit of her limb and that of her centre', and to find the Moon's semi-diameter in right ascension. There are two copies, dated 20 April and 3 August 1800. 2. 'From the right ascension of the Moon's first or second limb or centre and the observed zenith distance of her upper or lower limb or centre deduced from observation and corrected for refraction, to find the mean and apparent time of the observation, the longitude and latitude of the Moon's centre by the Nautical Almanac and the longitude and latitude of the Moon's centre resulting from the observation' (two copies). 3. 'To find the Moon's longitude and latitude to any given apparent time from the Nautical Almanac', 15 August 1808. 4. 'Rule to calculate the Moon's horizontal diameter from the time which her diameter takes to pass the meridian or any other horary circle.'. 5. 'To compute the immersion of a star at or the emersion from behind the Moon's limb.'. 6. 'Dr Maskelyne's last rule to compute the distance of the Moon from a star by spherical trigonometry, their difference of longitude and their latitudes being given', 22 March 1810. 7. Joseph de Lalande's rule to find the Sun's longitude by M. Guerrin's tables of right ascension, written on a piece of card. 8. Instructions and formulae for compiling a table of annual precession. 9. Instructions for reducing transits and computing longitude and latitude from observations. 10. 'To calculate the time of Sun's diameter passing the meridian, from the Sun's diameter given in the Nautical Almanac', 24 June 1805. 11. Corrections to James Bradley's transit observations, 1750-1759. 12. Time taken by the Moon's limb to move from wire to wire in the transit telescope, April 1794 (noted on a card). 13. 'Time of passage of a star or planet from one wire to another of a transit instrument', 1788. 14. "Rules to be observed in choosing the rate of the clock for reducing the observations.'. 15. 'Given the reduction of the clock at the transit of the stars with which the Moon or a planet is to be compared, to find the reduction at the transit of the planet' (noted on a card). 16. Rules to find the rate of the clock to be used when it differs on successive days. 17. Finding the mean time of an observation by a transit of the Sun on the following day or some days after. 18. Finding the mean time of an observation, knowing the time of the Sun's transit and the clock rate. 19. Reduction of a clock at the transit of the Sun and Moon (noted on a card). 20. Reduction of a clock at the transit of the stars and planets (a fair copy noted on a card). 21. 'Corrections necessary to be applied to the right ascension and declination of a planet, as immediately deduced from observations made with an equatorial instrument by comparison with a known fixed star, on account of refraction', three copies, one a fair copy. 22. Nine rules for reducing observations, 12 September 1781.
1 envelope.
1750–1810
168 Text on nutation of the Earth's axis. An undated text on James Bradley's work on a physical theory of the nutation of the Earth's axis, with three diagrams to illustrate the theories.
1 volume.
169 Drafts of Dr Waring's books. Dr Edward Waring's drafts for possible books entitled 'Meditationes Algebraicae' and 'Meditationes Analyticae'. . 'Meditationes Algebraicae' is divided into the following sections:. 1. The transformation of algebraical equations. 2. Limits and numbers of 'Impossible' (and) affirmative and negative roots of algebraical equations. 3. Finding the roots of equations or irrational quantities. 4. Algebraical equations and their reductions to one. 5. Rational and integral values of the unknown quantities of given equations. 6. Properties of algebraical curves. 'Meditationes Analyticae' is divided into four sections:. 1. Finding the fluxion of a fluent. 2. Increments and their integrals. 3. Infinite series. 4. Summation of series, method of correspondent values and several other problems.
1 volume.
circa 1770-circa 1776
170 Notes on mathematical theory. Various undated notes on mathematical theory relating to an unspecified book.
1 envelope.
171 Notes on observing Jovian satellites. Problems relating to the observations of Jupiter's satellites due to relative brightness: 'To find by observations the ratio of the absolute light of the satellite to the diminution of the same owing to the strength and proximity of Jupiter's light at the time.' The notes are undated.
1 envelope.
172 Theory of light refraction. 'A brief theory of the refraction of light thro' the atmosphere', undated.
1 envelope.
173 Theory of light reflection and refraction. 'Theory of the reflexion and refraction of light at the surface of mediums in motion, or when the light is moved with different velocities', undated.
1 envelope.
174 Illustrations of refraction corrections. Problems to illustrate the corrections to be allowed for refraction, taking into account the state of the barometer and thermometer, in finding the declination of the stars and the latitude of the place from zenith distance measurements taken of stars near to and remote from the pole. The work is dated 26 June 1809 at the end.
1 envelope.
1809
175 Observations of Jovian satellites. 'To find by observation the invisible segment in an eclipse of a satellite of Jupiter and to make a table of the ratio of light of the satellite to the diminution of the same owing to its nearness to Jupiter.' The work is dated 19 August 1794 halfway through the volume.
1 envelope.
19 Aug. 1794
176 Illustrations of finding apparent and mean time. Five problems to illustrate methods for finding the apparent and mean time from observations, with instructions and calculations.
1 envelope.
1755–1756
177 Rule for reducing lunar distance. 'A rigorous and easy rule of the nautical practice for reducing the observed distance of the Moon and the Sun or a fixed star into their true distance; presented by W.L. Krafft, Member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences at St Petersburg', dated St Petersburg, 22 July 1794.
1 envelope.
1794
178 Meridian observations using circles. 'Thoughts on whole circles intended for meridian observations only', an undated series of instructions to facilitate improved observational technique, with diagrams of the instrument involved.
1 envelope.
179 Construction and use of quadrants. John Gray, 'The construction and use of two new quadrants for finding the latitude and the longitude at land or at sea, by observations of the Moon and stars when near the Meridian', including accounts, with diagrams, on the construction and application of new land and sea quadrants, and various problems in finding latitude and longitude. At the end of the book is a contents list of specific points. The preface is dated 13 May 1778.
1 volume.
1778
180 The Obliquity of the Ecliptic. 'Of the Obliquity of the Ecliptic', a memoir by Guiseppe Piazzi, translated by Margaret Maskelyne in 1807 from Piazzi's 'Dell' Obliquita dell' eclittica'. 1. Zenith distance of the Sun by the satellites observed at Palermo, 1794-1803. 2. Obliquity of the ecliptic reduced from arithmetical observations, 1791-1803. 3. Obliquity of the ecliptic reduced from the Greenwich observations by Maskelyne, 1790-1799. 4. Difference of the obliquity of the summer and winter solstices. 5. The solstices at Palermo and Greenwich compared together. 6. Correction for the nutation depending on the perihelion of the Moon. 7. Mean obliquity of the ecliptic for 1800. 8. Annual decrease of the obliquity of the ecliptic. 9. 'Value of the nutation of the axis of the Earth passing the lunar node with a retrogate motion from the first of Libra to the first of Aries.'. 10. Supplement to Piazzi's memoirs of the obliquity of the ecliptic, taking the observations up to 1804.
1 envelope.
1807
181 Ramsden's circle at Palermo. Description by Giuseppe Piazzi of the circle made by Jesse Ramsden for the Observatory at Palermo, translated from the Italian by Margaret Maskelyne from Piazzi's, 'Della Specola Astronomica de' Regi Studi di Palermo', Libro II, capo Primo, p. 15 et seq. 1. General idea of the instrument. 2. Vertical axis. 3. The azimuth circle. 4. Supports of the vertical axis. 5. The iron circles. 6. The circle of mahogany. 7. The railing. 8. Mechanism for the circular motion of the vertical axis. 9. The microscopic micrometer of the azimuth circle. 10. The reflector of the azimuth circle. 11. The vertical circle. 12. Supports of the horizontal axis. 13. Mechanism to move the vertical circle on its own axis. 14. The upper microscopic micrometer of the vertical circle. 15. The lower microscopic micrometer of the vertical circle. 16. The plumb line. 17. Reflectors of the microscope. 18. The telescope. 19. Eye glasses. 20. Mechanism to illuminate the wires in the focus of the telescope. 21. Microscopic level. 22. The manner of fixing the first iron circle on the pavement and the four columns round it. 23. To place the vertical axis perpendicularly. 24. Adjustments of the horizontal axis. 25. To proportion the images formed by the microscopes. 26. Adjustments of the micrometer of the vertical circle. . 27. Reflection of the line of collimation with respect to the horizontal axis. 28. To determine the error of the line of collimation, with respect to the vertical axis. 29. To find and correct the error which may result to the angles measured by any change which may happen to the vertical axis. 30. The divisions of the circles and the manner of reading off. 31. The errors to which the observations may be subject. 32. Advantages of the circle.
1 envelope.
1805
182 Refraction of the altitude of the pole. An undated translation by Margaret Maskelyne of Guiseppe Piazzi's 'Of the mean refraction of the altitude of the pole of 38º 6' 44"'.
1 envelope.
183 Annual parallax of fixed stars. A translation by Margaret Maskelyne of 'Enquiries of Guiseppe Piazzi respecting the annual parallax of some of the principal fixed stars', including 'calculations of the time of the fixed stars in declination'; observations of Aldebaran, Capella, Sirius, Procyon, Arcturus, Alpha Lyrae and Antares; and a summary of the observations.
1 envelope.
1807
184 Correspondence on transits of Venus. A packet of letters and other items sewn together into one volume and entitled 'The Rev Mr Maskelyne's Letters, relating to the transit of Venus in 1761 and 1769 &c &c'. 1. Maskelyne to Charles Mason giving instructions on observing Venus' transit and financial arrangements on board the 'Sea Horse', addressed c/o Captain Smith, 29 November 1760. 2. Translations by Maskelyne of two papers by Alexandre Pingré:. i. 'Memoires de l'Academic Royales des Sciences', 1761, p. 437, concerning Mason's Cape observations of Venus. ii. 'Memoires de l'Academic Royales des Sciences', 1763, p. 354, casting doubts on Mr Dixon's observations as communicated to Mason. 3. Maskelyne to Mason 'at Robert Williams, Teacher of Mathematics, Tetbury, Gloucestershire', 31 January 1769, regarding travelling arrangements for Mason in Ireland for observing the transit of Venus. 4. Maskelyne to Mason enquiring about his failure to respond, 7 February 1769, sent to Robert Williams, teacher of mathematics, Tetbury, Gloucestershire. 5. Maskelyne's instructions for observing the transit of Venus for 1769, with diagrams. 6. 'Directions to be observed by Mr Charles Mason with respect to his making Astronomical Observations in the North west parts of Ireland', 22 February 1769: eight instructions by Maskelyne for fixing the place of the observation and for observing the transit of Venus. 7. Maskelyne to Mason at Cavan, near Strabane, County Donegal, near Londonderry, Ireland, 8 May 1769, giving further instructions on observational technique and Mr Shelton's reasons for a clock spring breakage. 8. Maskelyne to Mason at Cavan, 23 May 1769, concerning a solar eclipse to be observed shortly after the transit of Venus. . 9. Maskelyne to Mason at Cavan, 24 June 1769, concerning the success of Mason's observations of the transit of Venus and settling the longitude for these observations by occultations of small stars. 10. Maskelyne to Mason at Cavan, 7 August 1769, concerning settling the longitude of the Irish observations, and the results of other astronomers of Venus' transit, with comments on their poor quality. 11. Maskelyne to Mason at Cavan, 7 September 1769, concerning the 4 foot transit instrument and cometary observations. 12. Maskelyne to Mason at Cavan, 6 October 1769, concerning progress in settling the longitude at Cavan, occultations of stars, the whereabouts of the transit instruments, and cometary observations. 13. Maskelyne to Mason at Cavan, 9 November 1769, concerning cometary observations, the technique employed in making them, and Maskelyne's pleasure at the results. 14. Maskelyne to Mason at Mr Burn's, near the White Heart, Newington, Bucks, undated, concerning instructions for comparing the 1761 transit of Venus observed at the Cape with that observed in Ireland in 1769. 15. Maskelyne's computations for finding the apparent time of the external contact, etc., at Cavan, written in the hand of Charles Mason, with a few calculations on the longitude of Greenwich.
1 envelope.
1760–1769
185 Draft letters. Miscellaneous draft letters. . 1. Letter to James Ewart Esq. of Lancaster, 18 August 1794, forwarding details of lunar occultations and a solar eclipse, with notes and calculations on an eclipse. 2. Letter to Monsieur Julian Canelas, Directeur de l'Observatoire a l'Isle de St Leon, 11 December 1806, on occultations of stars and a solar eclipse. There are notes on Stephen Groombridge's circle on the reverse. 3. Draft letter to George Dollond, September 1808, concerning the focal length of a 6 foot telescope. . 4. Instructions for John Crosley to go on a voyage to New Holland (Australia) on board HMS 'Investigator' on a scientific expedition, 7 March 1801. The letter gives instructions on observations to be taken on board ship, details of observations to be taken on shore, general directions and an inventory of instruments required. 5. Sanction for James Inman to replace John Crosley on the scientific expedition to New Holland (Australia), c. 1803. There are instructions for him to board ship, details of observations to be made at sea and on shore, and general directions.
1 envelope.
1794–1808
186 Observations of John Crosley. Observations made by John Crosley on his voyage to New Holland (Australia) on board HMS 'Investigator' to carry out surveying. 1. Comparison of Thomas Earnshaw and John Arnold's time-keepers, 17 June 1801. 2. Rates of time-keepers at Portsmouth, 1801. 3. Astronomical observations made at sea between Portsmouth and Madeira, 19 July - 1 August 1801. 4. Observations on board the ship at Madeira, 3-6 August 1801. 5. Rates of the time-keepers, with their errors, from the mean time of Funchall Bay, Madeira. 6. Longitude and latitude of Funchall Bay, 1801. 7. Observations made on board ship at sea, 9-15 October 1801. 8. Astronomical observations made on a shore near the Block House, Simons Bay, False Bay, Cape of Good Hope, October 1801. 9. Equal altitudes of the Sun. 10. Accounts of the daily rates of the time-keepers, 21 October - 1 November 1801. 11. Account of the errors of the time-keepers from mean time, Simons Bay, False Bay, Cape of Good Hope. 12. Observations made on shore near the Block House, Simons Bay, for finding the longitude. 13. Eclipse of the Moon, 11 September 1802. 14. Longitude of Simons Bay, Cape of Good Hope, 1801-1802. 15. Latitude and longitude of the Island of Trinadada, 23 September 1801. 16. Rate of pocket time-keeper No. 465 at the Cape of Good Hope, 1801-1803.
1 volume.
1801–1803
187 Miscellaneous correspondence. Miscellaneous correspondence comprised largely of letters to Nevil Maskelyne. 1. Letter from Israel Lyons Jnr, Cambridge, 1766, containing calculations for the occultations of stars. 2. Letter from John Campbell, East Sheen, Surrey, 15 September 1771, forwarding an account of a solar eclipse of 25 July 1767 observed by Captain Wallis from HMS 'Dolphin' in Port Royal Harbour, King George's Island (Tahiti). 3. Letter from Captain John Wallis, Frithhill, near St Germans, Cornwall, 17 December 1771, regarding the circumstances of the eclipse of 25 July 1767 mentioned in the previous letter. 4. Letter from Robert Fenwick, officer of the Royal Artillery, Barbados, 17 October 1770, containing observations of the stars and Jupiter's satellites to determine the longitude of Barbados. . 5. Letter from Lord Sandwich, Hincking Brook, 1 June 1772, requesting attendance at the election of a Professor of Chemistry. 6. Letter from William Marsden, Fort Marlbro., 25 November 1772, giving favourable comments on finding longitudes with a sextant. 7. Letter from Israel Lyons, 22 August 1774, regarding a problem to find instrumental errors using the known right ascensions of stars, and errors in a pendulum at altitudes. An unconnected note, dated 22 August to 28 September 1774, concerning theodolite measurements for the Schiehallion Experiment has been included with the letter. 8. Letter from Gianguiseppe Barzellini, written in Italian, 11 November 1774, communicating his paper 'Altezza di Polo della citta di Gorizia' ('The Altitude of the Pole of the City of Gorizia'). 9. Letter from Captain Huddart, 25 March 1780, regarding eclipses of Jupiter's satellites observed at Bombay. 10. Letter from Mrs M. Edwards, Ludlow, Herefordshire, 18 June 1785, concerning the 1795 computations and a request to settle an account. 11. Covering letter for two enclosed papers from Charles Hutton, Woolwich, 27 June 1785, with Maskelyne's calculations written on the letter. 12. Letter from William Wales, 23 March 1786, commenting on the accuracy of some tables. 13. Letter to William Wales from John Harrison, Masham, Yorkshire, 4 May 1787, reporting that he no longer has any record of the observations he made as purser on HMS 'Dolphin' of the eclipse observed from Port Royal, Tahiti, on 25 July 1767. 14. Item number unassigned. 15. Undated letter from Captain Mudge, Amesbury, Wiltshire, requesting material relative to a trigonometrical survey, with some equations by Maskelyne. 16. Letter from H. Parker at the Admiralty, 7 June 1792, regarding John Wood's papers, with calculations by Maskelyne. 17. Invitation from George Gilpin, 18 November 1793, to a Royal Society meeting on 21 November, with various scribbled calculations. 18. Letter from Charles Hutton, Woolwich, 19 December 1793, regarding a dictionary, with various calculations and equations. 19. Letter from William Gooch, Brockdish, Norfolk, 27 April 1794, on the amicable settling of accounts. 20. Invitation to dinner addressed to 'My Dear Tycho' (possibly a familiar name for Maskelyne) from James Stuart Mackenzie, Hill Street, 24 April 1795, with various equations. 21. Note from Mrs Ward, Mayfair, 16 May 1795, giving the address of Mrs James, with criticism of Mayer's logic. 22. Letter from Mr Rowed of the Globe Tavern, Fleet Street, 15 June 1795, regarding the meeting of the 'Club' to be held at Maskelyne's house, with various computations. 23. Letter from Joseph Cawthorne, Greenwich Park, 9 September 1795, regarding an appointment to meet Mr Ward and friends at the Royal Observatory, with algebraic equations on the back. 24. Letter from G. Eckard, 15 December 1795, giving his compliments, with a note on the reverse in Maskelyne's hand on the construction of an optical instrument. 25. Undated note from Dr Layard on the guarantee of supporting Maskelyne's favoured candidate at an election, with various computations. 26. Letter from Charles Hutton, Woolwich, 27 February 1796, concerning Simpson's method for computing series. 27. Letter from George Gilpin, 3 April 1797, giving notice of a Royal Society meeting next Thursday, with various calculations. 28. Letter from George Gilpin, 8 May 1797, giving notice of a Royal Society meeting on 11 May 1797, with various computations. 29. Letter from George Gilpin, 12 March 1798, giving notice of a Royal Society meeting on 15 March 1798, with various computations. 30. Letter from William Wales, Christ's Hospital, 5 June 1798, regarding the examination of papers by the 'Committee', including Sir Joseph Banks. 31. Letter from Thomas Wright, Island of St John, 1 May 1799, regarding ascertaining the boundary in the St Croix river, U.S.A., by means of observing Jupiter's satellites. 32. Letter from William Manwaring, Paddington, 17 December 1799, regarding gifts of a pair of pigeons, some pears and jam, with various scribbled calculations. 33. Letter from George Gilpin, 6 July 1801, giving notice of a Royal Society visitation, with calculations. 34. Note on time-keepers by J. Earnshaw, High Holborn, 30 August 1801, with various additional notes and equations. 35. Letter from Messrs Key and Sons, Abchurch Lane, 15 August 1803, forwarding specimens of paper, with various stellar observations on the reverse of 12 October 1804. 36. Letter from F. Amoros and F. de Gilleman, 'officiers du Ministere de la Guerre', Madrid, 22 August 1803, written in French, reporting observations of a solar eclipse by Ali-Beik Abd-Allah at Tangier. 37. Letter from James Horsburgh, Bombay, 31 May 1804, containing observations of the first and second satellites of Jupiter in 1803. 38. Letter from Julian Canelas, Isle of Leon, 5 October 1806, containing occultations of Antares, March 1805, and the solar eclipse, 16 June 1806. 39. Letter from James Pascoe, Honiton, Devon, 11 October 1806, confirming the accuracy of the French tables, with equations on the ellipsis overleaf. 40. Letter from William Bligh, Governor of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, 28 January 1807, containing two copies of observations of an eclipse of the Sun. 41. Letter from William Bligh, Governor of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, 31 October 1807, containing observations of a comet. 42. Letter from Peter and George Dollond, London, 8 October 1807, regarding the despatch of a pocket globe, with a sketch relative to Stephen Groombridge's scheme. 43. Letter from George Dollond, 15 August 1808, London, regarding the specifications of an object-glass for a 6 foot telescope, with various dimensions of convex and concave lenses. 44. Letter from George Dollond, London, 22 August 1808, regarding the thickness of the glass in the 6 foot object glass, with diagrams. 45. Letter from George Dollond, London, 13 September 1808, giving answers to enquiries involving the 6 foot telescope. 46. Letter from J. Merdbey, Woolwich, 18 April 1809, paying his respects, with various equations on the reverse. 47. Letter from Stephen Groombridge, 24 April 1809, regarding amendments to a book, with various equations on the reverse. 48. Letter from Maskelyne answering points raised by a pamphlet of John Harrison's and setting out facts to be considered by the Board of Longitude in evaluating Harrison's claim to the second £10,000 of the prize for finding longitude at sea.
1 envelope.
1766–1809
188 Number unassigned.
189 Calculations and equations. Various undated calculations and equations.
1 volume.
190 Astronomical computations. Undated astronomical computations, tables, rules and observations, including:. 1. The rules for finding the constant number to be added to the longitude of the Moon to find the argument of deviation in regard to specified stars. 2. Rules for finding the aberration of a star in longitude, latitude, right ascension and north polar distance. 3. Stars in the British Catalogue. 4. To find the nonagesimal degree and its altitude with reference to various places. 5. To find the variation of right ascension and declination of any celestial object. 6. Corrections to be applied to the stars' right ascensions. 7. Edmond Halley's manuscript observations, vol. I: observations of circumpolar stars. 8. The method for computing the two tables at the end of Johann Mayer's tables for correcting ecliptic right ascension and declination. 9. To find the apparent altitudes of the Moon and Aldebaran in order to compute the effect of refraction. 10. Parallax and refraction computed using Mr Durtherne's new tables and calculations using various examples. 11. Method for computing the Moon's altitude. 12. To compute the time of the beginning or end of an eclipse of the Sun, and the time of the middle of the eclipse. 13. Computation for an occultation of a star. 14. Star observations in relation to the Moon's longitude. 15. Rules for finding that part of the deviation in right ascension which is different for different stars. 16. To find the altitude of the nonagesimal. 17. The difference of altitudes of the Moon or a star in a spheroid to what they would be in a sphere. 18. Aberrations of bodies in right ascension and declination. 19. Various equations and the Moon's latitude. 20. Occultations of the stars by the Moon.
1 envelope.
191 Equations on conic sections. Miscellaneous equations on conic sections, precession, the zenith distance of the Moon and longitude by a time-keeper.
1 envelope.
1787–1791
192 Computations. Computations and equations, with properties of lines about the circle, fluxions, hyperbolae, Cotes' Theorem and spherical triangles.
1 envelope.
1789–1791
193 Lunar calculations. An exercise book comprised primarily of calculations and equations relating to the Moon. The volume includes:. 1. A note in Latin on the ellipse. 2. Distance of the Earth from Jupiter and the Sun. 3. Remarks on Simpson's theory of the Moon. 4. Observations of stars, 1689-1715. 5. Days on which transits and zenith distances of the Sun and transits of stars proper for settling the Sun's right ascension were observed by Edmond Halley, 1726-1729. 6. Right ascensions and north polar distances of stars near the equator. 7. Transits of small stars observed by Halley with the 5 ft transit instrument. 8. Mean place of the Sun's apogee, 1751-1761. 9. Correction to be applied to the maximum of any equation, with demonstrations and examples. 10. Corrections to find latitude. 11. Calculations to find 'the mean of the sines'. 12. Equations to find the Moon's longitude from observations, 1751-1760. 13. Directions sent to Charles Mason, 4 June and July 1772. 14. Rules for finding the maxima of the Moon's equations. 15. Moon's equations in longitude. 16. Mason's corrections to the Moon's equations. 17. Error, if any, in the Moon's diameter used in the reduction of James Bradley's observations of the Moon, and the true value of the maximum of the Sun's first part of the variation, which comes to its maximum at the quadratures of the Moon with the Sun. 18. Mean variation of errors of the tables and their corrections. 19. Effect of a force perpendicular to the tangent of the orbit of a body, with reference to eccentric orbits. 20. Motion of the aphelion of a planet from the action of another. 21. Equations on gravity.
1 volume.
circa 1751-circa 1772
194 Accounts and notes. Miniature book containing financial transactions, dates of meetings, wages paid, a remedy for an unknown ailment, renewing licenses and some astronomical observations.
1 volume.
1809–1810
195 Accounts and notes. Miniature address book containing notes on the observational technique of William Herschel and his sister, various financial transactions and accounts. Many of the entries are crossed out.
1 volume.
1791–1795
196 Nautical astronomy. A work on dealing with problems in ascertaining latitude and longitude at sea by observation of the stars, with descriptions, computations and formulae referred to apparent time. There are also pieces on finding the Moon's longitude from the nautical ephemeris, the motion of the Sun's image in a Hadley quadrant, and the testing of other people's hypotheses.
1 envelope.
1790–1810
197 Observations and equations. Looseleaf miscellaneous observations and equations, principally on star observations and reductions. The papers also include a piece on water clocks; a star catalogue for 1766-1802; extensive comparisons with 'Rømer's Triduum' (the list of his meridian transit observations at Copenhagen Observatory, 20-23 October 1706); the error of geocentric longitude and latitude of the 1807 comet; differences of the Sun's observed right ascension from that in the 'Nautical Almanac', 1807-1808; observations of the transit of Mercury, 9 November 1802, and of Capella, 1808; Venus observed in the ascending node at Greenwich, 1738; the 1761 transit of Venus observed from Copenhagen; and the position of various places throughout the world, 1794-1797.
1 bundle.
circa 1738-circa 1808
198 Star catalogue. Star catalogue and north polar distances of fixed stars taken from various observatories and reduced to the year 1800.
1 volume.
1800–1806
199 Papers on astronomical instruments. Various papers on astronomical instruments, errors and adjustments, including the focal length of the lens in the telescope, telescopic levels, micrometers, of angles with the theodolite and adjustments to the line of collimation.
1 envelope.
1786–1808
200 Memorandum and financial notes. A memorandum, 11 September 1790, concerning work remaining to be done at Greenwich by way of repairs and alterations to the Observatory, and rough notes on financial affairs, such as the assistants' salaries and Maskelyne's pension.
1 envelope.
1766–1804
201 Papers on general astronomy. Papers on general astronomy split into four sections. 1. Work on Saturn's rings, in particular the disappearance and reappearance of Saturn's rings, 1788-1790; aberrations of stars in right ascension, longitude and latitude and north polar distance; accounts to find the annual parallax or aberration in any given direction, 1807; and equations of time of the eclipse of Jupiter's satellites. There are many formulae, instructions and descriptions on the above matters. 2. Detailed instructions, formulae and diagrams for solving problems of nutation and precession, with tracts on the motion of the poles in the Earth's orbit and motion of the Moon's node, 1785-1801. The papers are bound by a subscription list to the Diocesan Fund, Oxford, 1843. 3. Detailed instructions, formulae and diagrams for solving problems on refraction of star light, with pieces on the errors in the instruments and micrometer, computations of refractions from James Bradley's observation of major stars, and rules to calculate the refraction to be allowed according to temperature and pressure. 4. Rules, formulae, computations and diagrams on probable errors.
1 bundle.
circa 1786-circa 1843
202 Ephemerides. Astronomical tables and ephemerides, including notes on Burg's new lunar tables, elements of solar tables of several astronomers (de Lalande, Mayer, de Lacaille, Morris, Mason and Howe) and several memoranda on comparisons of various stars.
1 envelope.
1755–1795
203 Papers on solving cometary orbits. Papers on the formulae, instructions and diagrams for solving the problems of cometary orbits. There are articles on the comparisons of places of a comet from computed elements, calculating the Sun's longitude and radius vector, corrections of the motion of the 1682 comet, synopsis of calculations from observed places of a comet to find its future position, a difference table for the prediction of the place of a comet, distances of a comet from the Earth, its horizontal parallax and aberration, and its geocentric and heliocentric longitude and latitude.
1 folder.
circa 1808
204 Formulae on lunar and planetary theory. Formulae, instructions and diagrams for solving problems on lunar theory, planetary theory and celestial mechanics by testing Maskelyne's contemporaries' hypotheses.
1 envelope.
1795–1807
205 Hebrew-Latin translation of Genesis. A translation of the first chapters of the Book of Genesis from Hebrew into Latin.
1 volume.
1752–1754
206 Draft of a will and calculations. A rough draft in Maskelyne's hand of a will witnessed by Thomas Hammersley, William Morland and Lewis Jones on 20 July 1786, in which Maskelyne is mentioned as one of the beneficiaries. There are also gravitational calculations, an inventory of clothing and calculations for wages.
1 envelope.
1786
207 Notes on mathematics and optics. Rough notes on mathematical, optical and astronomical problems, largely in the period 1777-1783, including a table of errors for an eye-glass. There are a number of poems and epigrams penned by Maskelyne whilst at Cambridge during 1750-1757, written in English and Latin, with versions of the 18th, 23rd, 29th and 84th Psalms and a translation of Sophocles. There is also a bill for food from H. Storey, 1810, and an etching. Some pages of manuscript have been cut from the volume.
1 volume.
1750–1810
208 Account of a Peruvian expedition. A translated account of the Peruvian expedition of 1736-1746 undertaken by Pierre Bouguer, Louis Godin and Charles de la Condamine of the French Royal Academy of Sciences to measure the degrees of the meridian about the Equator and thence deduce the figure of the Earth. There are descriptions of the country in which the experiments were performed, covering topics such as fauna, wildlife, climate, the influence of the Church, agriculture, geography, soil, ethnography, social stratification, volcanic activity and the Inca civilisation.
1 volume.
1736–1750
209 Papers on the Eumenides. Undated loose papers on the poems on the Eumenides, including an etching depicting a classical war, possibly Achilles and Hector under the walls of Troy.
1 envelope.
210 Papers on poetry and mathematics. Loose papers concerned with poetry and mathematical problems. The poetry is comprised principally of notes on the Eumenides and classical Greek poets. There is a review of the Oedipus of Sophocles, a reference to the rules of Aristotle, fluxions, a map of Palestine, a synopsis of writing technique and style, and equations involving parabolas.
1 envelope.
1750–1808
211 Papers on astronomy. Loose papers on physical astronomy containing a considerable number of miscellaneous calculations, including works on the force of the Sun on the Moon in the direction of the radius vector, methods for finding alterations of the plane of the lunar orbit, and abstracts on the work of Laplace and Lagrange.
1 envelope.
1754–1807
212 Papers on physical astronomy. Papers largely on planetary theory, in the form of miscellaneous loose papers, diagrams and calculations. The items includes Simpson's theory of the Earth's motion, calculations on Venus and Mars' distances from the Earth and their influence on the Earth's orbit, 'Of ye motion of ye Sun's aphelium', and an extract from 'Connaissance des Temps', 1760.
1 folder.
1760–1801
213 Stellar positions and proper motion. Remarks and tables on proper motion and comparisons of star positions. The volume includes the apparent diameter of the Sun, Moon and primary planets as viewed from the Earth; changes in the obliquity of the ecliptic, 1668-1822, and that observed by the Arab astronomers, 832-1463; unused forms for observational results; proper motion of Arcturus in right ascension from Tycho's observations; rules on aberration of light in calculating the place of a planet; longitude of Cambridge, New England, U.S.A., deduced from Mercury; the heliocentric velocity of planets; the augmentation of the Moon's diameter from its altitude; a star catalogue, 1765-1769; and stars not in the British Catalogue observed by Edmond Halley, 1721-1730.
1 volume.
circa 1765-circa 1822
214 Number unassigned.
215 Determining cometary orbits. Pierre-Simon Laplace's printed account for determining the orbit of comets, from 'Memoires de l'Academie Royal des Sciences', 1780, presented to Maskelyne on behalf of the author.
1 volume.
1780
216 'Nautical Almanac' and lunar occultations. Two pieces relating to the 'Nautical Almanac' and methods to determine the times of lunar occultations. There are rules for computing the time of immersion or emersion of a star at the Moon's limb, computation of parallax, and rules for computing the occultation of fixed stars by the Moon.
1 envelope.
1768
217 New method of reading instruments. A fine copy of James Strode, 'An attempt to Introduce a New Method of reading off in Astronomical Observations', written at Newington, Surrey. The volume includes a sketch of part of the limb of a quadrant, with details of the division of the scale.
1 volume.
1786
218 Problem on finding the longitude. 'A problem proposed by Dr Halley' on finding longitude, and the course steered, with its attached solution. The author and date of the piece are not known.
1 envelope.
219 Instrument for taking angles at sea. 'Description of an instrument for taking Angles at Sea', as presented to the Board of Longitude by John Wood, 1 March 1792, including a detailed drawing of the instrument.
1 envelope.
1792
220 Rules for constructing new tables. William Garrard, 'Demonstration of the rules for Construction of the New Tables for reducing the Apparent to the true distance in Lunar observations', with examples of the application of the rules and a chapter on the latitudes and longitudes of several places calculated from observations on HMS 'Thetis', 1794-1797.
1 volume.
circa 1797
221 Observations at Palermo. A fair copy of results of the observations of the 'new star' (Ceres) discovered at Palermo by Guiseppe Piazzi, 1 January 1801, translated from the original Italian by Antonio Parachinetti. The volume includes a table on the 'star's' position.
1 volume.
circa 1801
222 Observations at Palermo. A rough copy of the observations of Ceres, discovered at Palermo by Guiseppe Piazzi, 1 January 1801, translated from the original Italian by Antonio Parachinetti.
1 envelope.
circa 1801
223 Newton's 'Principia'. 'The first three sections of the Cambridge Edition of Sir Isaac Newton's Principia 1810', pp. 1-90, written in Latin, with annotations by Maskelyne.
1 volume.
1765
224 Life and labour of N. Maskelyne. 'Notice sur la Vie et les Travaux de N Maskelyne lue a la Séance publique de l'Institut National de France, du 4 Janvier 1813, par M. Le Chevalier Delambre, Secretaire perpetuel', a biography of Maskelyne's life and work, received by Margaret Maskelyne, 22 April 1813.
1 folder.
1813
225 Life and labour of N. Maskelyne. 'Account of the life and labour of N Maskelyne read at the public meeting of the National Institute of France on the 4th January 1813 by Mr Le Chevalier Delambre, Perpetual Secretary', a manuscript translation of RGO 4/224, for printing by de Hansard junior.
1 volume.
1813
226 Life and works of Dr Maskelyne. 'Memoirs of the life and works of the late Dr Maskelyne read at the Public Meeting of the National Institute of France 1813 January 4th by A Delambre, Secretary, translated from the French and communicated by a correspondent', a fair copy of RGO 4/225.
1 envelope.
1813
227 Life and works of Dr Maskelyne. 'Memoirs of the life and works of the late Dr Maskelyne read at the Public Meeting of the National Institute of France 1813 January 4th by A Delambre, Secretary, translated from the French and communicated by a correspondent', a copy of RGO 4/226.
1 envelope.
1813
228 Life and works of Dr Maskelyne. 'Memoirs of the life and works of the late Dr Maskelyne read at the Public Meeting of the National Institute of France 1813 January 4th by A Delambre, Secretary, translated from the French and communicated by a correspondent', a rough copy of RGO 4/226.
1 envelope.
1813
229 Draft of Maskelyne memoirs. A rough draft of the memoirs of the life and work of the late Dr Maskelyne, read by A. Delambre at the public meeting of the National Institute of France, 4 January 1813, taken from RGO 4/226.
1 envelope.
1813
230 Treatises on arithmetic and algebra. Five undated treatises by Samuel Vince dealing with arithmetical and algebraic problems. The subjects covered are series, ten points on logarithms, a method of finding reciprocal numbers, imaginary numbers and roots.
1 envelope.
231 Treatise on rotary motion of bodies. A treatise submitted to Samuel Vince 'On the rotary Motion of Bodies about a fixed Axis', containing instructions, diagrams and equations.
1 envelope.
circa 1780
232 Notes on mathematical problems. Various rough, undated notes on mathematical problems, with computations and diagrams, including calculations in spherical trigonometry; an etching of an equatorial telescope, with annotations; sixteen objects observed with Dr Herschel's telescope; and weather conditions, 21 October - 21 November, year unknown.
1 envelope.
233 Letters to Samuel Vince. 1. Undated letter from R.C. Barnard on letting some property. 2. Undated letter from S.B. Vince asking his father for his thoughts on three sermons. 3. Letter from Edward Waring, 23 June 1796, promising his vote at an election. 4. Letter from I. Wilson, Ramsgate, 16 June 1805, on enquiries he has made on Vince's behalf as to the possibility of renting a property. 5. Letter from Samuel Hinds Jnr, 28 November 1811, regarding typographical errors in the last edition of 'Fluxions'. 6. Part of a letter from Thomas Martyn, Kimbolton, Huntingdon, 17 December 1811, on matters relating to mathematical publications, with a note from S.B. Vince. 7. Request from William Purkis, Balsham, Cambridgeshire, 5 January 1812, for the option to purchase or rent a farm.
1 envelope.
1796–1812
234 Fifteen mathematical rules. Fifteen mathematical rules, with equations and seven other associated points.
1 volume.
1759
235 Notes on mathematical theorems. A work on theorems involving fluxions and the use of binomial theorem, with many algebraic equations used to solve various proposed problems. The sections are dated March and May 1760.
1 volume.
1760
236 Booklet on mechanics and falling bodies. An undated booklet by Israel Lyons on mechanics and mechanical problems and on the mathematics of falling bodies.
1 volume.
237 Booklet on mechanics. A booklet on mechanics, with diagrams and equations of falling bodies and projectiles, autographed 'I L' (Israel Lyons).
1 volume.
1767
238 Book on central forces. A book on central forces by Israel Lyons, including articles on resistance to bodies moving under central forces. The volume includes an answer to Mr Murdoch on the centre of gravity, October 1758, and extracts and analysis of propositions from Newton's 'Principia'.
1 volume.
1758–1759
239 Booklet on central forces. A booklet by Israel Lyons on central forces, with diagrams and equations.
1 volume.
240 Booklet on Newton's 'Principia'. An undated booklet by Israel Lyons on Newton's 'Principia', Book 1, Proposition 91, Corollary 2, dealing with Newton's differential method concerning the logarithmic spiral.
1 volume.
241 Analysis of Cotes' 'Scholium generale'. An analysis by Israel Lyons of the problems in the 'Scholium Generale of Cotes Harmonia Mensurum'.
1 volume.
1756
242 Treatise of fluxions. The original manuscript of Israel Lyons' 'Treatise of Fluxions', divided into twelve sections. 1. The direct method of fluxions: i. Definitions; ii. Fluxions of the sum and differences of quantities; iii. Fluxions of rectangles and powers; iv. To find the relation of the fluxion from the relation of the fluents; v. Of 2nd, 3rd and 4th fluxions. 2. The inverse method of fluxions: i. Of the fluents of simple quantities; ii. Newton's binomial theorem demonstrated; iii. Demoivre's multinomial theorem and quantities; iv. Of the fluents of compound and surd quantity; v. Theorems for finding fluents; vi. Finding fluents by successive fluxions and fluents; vii. Of the resolution of adfected literal equations; viii. Of the resolution of fluxional equations; ix. Reversion of series. 3. Logarithms and measures of ratios: i. Composition of ratios; ii. To find the measure of any ratio; iii. Series for finding logarithms; iv. Of exponentials; v. Finding of fluents by the measures of ratios. 4. Of curves and drawing of tangents: i. Definitions; ii. Of lines of the first and second order; iii. Of the conchoid of Nicomedes; iv. Of the cissoid of Diocles, paraboloids and hyperboloides; v. To draw tangents to any curve; vi. To draw tangents to the conic sections; vii. To draw tangents to the conchoid; viii. To draw tangents to the cissoid; ix. To draw tangents to paraboloids and hyperboloides; x. Of mechanical curves; xi. Of the logarithmic curve; xii. Of cycloids; xiii. Of spirals; xiv. Of the quadratrix. 5. Of the greatest and least ordinates: i. Of Tayler's theorem; ii. To find when an ordinate becomes a maximum or minimum of the first kind; iii. Of the second kind; iv. Examples; v. Of the curve of swiftest descent; vi. To draw a perpendicular to a curve. 6. Of the curvature of curves: i. Curvature of different circle; ii. To find the radius of curvature in any curve; iii. Of the evoluta; iv. Variations of curvatures; v. To find the curvature of a conic section; vi. To find the curvature of a conchoid; vii. To find the curvature of a cissoid; viii. To find the curvature of a paraboloid; ix. To find the curvature of a logarithmic curve; x. To find the curvature of a cycloid; xi. To find the curvature of a quadratrix; xii. To find the quadrature in the curve of swiftest descent; xiii. To find the curvature of spirals; xiv. To find the curvature of the epicycloid; xv. Of the curvature in the figure mentioned by Sir Isaac Newton, 'Princip Lib 3 prop 28'; xvi. To investigate the curve in which the radius of curvature is inversely as any power of the ordinates. 7. Of the points of contrary flexion: i. Definition; ii. Examples in the conchoid, paraboloid and cycloid; iii. To find the points of contrary flexure in a spiral; iv. Of cuspids; v. Examples in the cissoid and paraboloid. 8. Of the quadrature of curves: i. Comparison of fluents; ii. Of the fluxions of curvilinear areas; iii. To find the area of the parabola, paraboloid, hyperbola and circle; iv. Of fluents that may be compared with the circle; v. To find the area of an ellipsis and hyperbola; vi. Of fluents that may be compared with the hyperbola, cissoid, conchoid, logarithmic curve, cycloid and quadratrix; vii. To find the area when the equation is an adfected equation, and the area of a spiral; viii. Compute the area of the differences of the fluxions of the ordinates; ix. To compute the area by equidistant ordinates. 9. The rectification of curve lines: i. To find the length of a parabola, paraboloid, circle by infinite series, and the circle by logarithms; ii. The demonstration of Mr Cotes' theorem; iii. To find the length of an ellipse, hyperbola, cissoid, conchoid, logarithmic curve, cycloid, quadratrix and spirals. 10. Of the contents of solids: i. Fluxions of solids; ii. The content of the solid generated by a paraboloid, ellipse and hyperbola, cissoid, conchoid, logarithmic curve and quadratrix. 11. Of the quadrature of curvilinear surfaces: i. The surface of a cone; ii. The fluxions of curved surfaces; iii. Area of the surface generated by a paraboloid; iv. Surfaces of a sphere, hyperbolic conoid, spheroid, cissoid and logarithmic curve; v. When a surface is finite and when infinite. 12. Of the centre of gravity: i. To find the centre of gravity of a paraboloid, circle and ellipse, hyperbola, circular arc, solid described by a paraboloid, segment of a sphere or spheroid and hyperbolic conoid; ii. Centre of oscillation; iii. To find the centre of oscillation of a right line, circle, sphere and paraboloid; iv. Of the casenaria; v. Solutions to some logometrical problems.
1 volume.
circa 1758
243 Analysis of Cotes' 'Scholium Generale'. An analysis by Israel Lyons of the construction in Roger Cotes' 'Scholium Generale', with an index to fourteen problems.
1 volume.
1756
244 Booklet on mechanics, planets, moments and capillaries. An undated booklet by Israel Lyons containing sections on mechanical powers, primary planets, moments of bodies and capillary tubes.
1 volume.
245 Projectiles in resisting media. Various tables and equations on the solution to the problem of projectiles in resisting media.
1 volume.
1775
246 Solution of algebraic equations. Differential method by Israel Lyons for the solution to algebraic equations using difference tables, with a loose price list for French science books of 1760-1787.
1 volume.
circa 1760-circa 1787
247 Solutions by the differential method. Differential method by Israel Lyons, with various algebraic equations and difference tables.
1 volume.
1775
248 Differences of sines of equidistant arcs. Differences of sines of equidistant arcs, including two copies of letters on the subject of differences of equations, with an example of a table thus produced. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
249 Notes on the solution of an equation. An untitled and undated booklet containing notes on the solution of an equation.
1 volume.
250 Algebraic notes. Various undated algebraic notes dealing with the clearing of surds from algebraic equations and a brief resumé of the work of Leonard of Pisa. The volume was compiled by Israel Lyons.
1 volume.
251 Algebraic equations to find roots. Various algebraic equations by Israel Lyons on finding roots of equations.
1 volume.
252 Roots of equations. 'Roots of equations', including some algebraic calculations. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
253 Roots of equations. 'Roots of equations', including many algebraic calculations. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
254 Equations. Equations, including an extract from the 'Actis Eruditorum' of 1683 (a piece on calculus) and a 55-page mathematical treatise dated March 1759 to March 1760.
1 volume.
circa 1759-circa 1760
255 Mathematical booklet. 'Resolution of Equations by approximations', 'Transformation of Series - Logs', 'Construction of Biquadratic Equations' (by Edmond Halley's method) and 'Of finding the Time of the Solstices'. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
256 Treatise on infinite series. A mathematical treatise, with a contents list.
1 volume.
1760
257 Treatise on infinite series. A mathematical treatise on various subjects, including finding the value of a fraction, to reduce them to a summable form, and a series produced by multiplication. The sections are dated 1759 and March, June and September 1760.
1 volume.
1759–1760
258 Sums of infinite series. 'Sums of infinite Series', with a reference to 'Philosophical Transactions', abr. Vol. 4, p. 153. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
259 Of infinite products. A treatise by Israel Lyons, including pieces to resolve an infinite product into an infinite series, to express fluents by infinite products and of interpoling series by infinite products. There are numerous examples of finding the value of a product.
1 envelope.
1758
260 Arithmetic. An undated work on fractions and series.
1 volume.
261 Number puzzle solutions. Solutions to number puzzles, magic squares and mathematical riddles, including a coloured diagrammatic illustration of Euclid 47, 1. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
262 Book on analytic geometry. 'Artis Analytica specimina vel Geometrica Analytica', an unbound and undated book on geometrical problems, in ten sections.
1 envelope.
263 Booklet on analytic geometry. A booklet on analytical geometry dealing with Roger Cotes' theorem and including the centre of oscillation of an ellipse. The sections are dated April 1759 to March 1760.
1 volume.
1759–1760
264 Booklet on the theory of conic sections. An undated booklet on the theory of conic sections, including various equations and diagrams.
1 volume.
265 Apollonius's propositions relating to the Foci. An undated work on conic sections, including diagrams.
1 envelope.
266 Lengths of curve of the parabolic form. A mathematical treatise.
1 volume.
Mar. 1775
267 Notes on arcs with variable radius. Mathematical notes on arcs with variable radius.
1 volume.
Feb. 1775
268 Paper on conchoids. An undated paper on the conchoid and in particular the conchoid of Nicomedes.
1 volume.
269 Booklet on trigonometry. An undated booklet on plane and spherical trigonometry.
1 volume.
270 Booklet on trigonometry. A booklet on trigonometry containing a number of calculations.
1 volume.
1774
271 Booklet on spherical trigonometry. 'Contractions in spherical trigonometry', undated.
1 volume.
272 Notes on cyclometry. Undated notes on equations in cyclometry.
1 volume.
273 Cambridge University examination papers. Cambridge University examination papers in mathematics, with answers, 1769-1771, apparently in competition for 'Dr Smith's prizes', with a list of candidates, 1769-1776. The candidates include Dr Samuel Vince of Caius College, who was first prizeman and senior wrangler in 1775.
1 envelope.
1769–1776
274 Question paper on astronomy and mathematics. A question paper of 27 January 1777 containing thirty questions on astronomy and mathematics.
1 envelope.
1777
275 Instructions and equations on optics. Instructions, equations and diagrams relating to optics. Two of the sections are dated June 1762 and April 1763 respectively.
1 volume.
circa 1762-circa 1763
276 Notes on light refraction. Undated notes on the refraction of light, with equations and diagrams.
1 volume.
277 Notes on mathematical problems. Undated mathematical notes on problems concerning falling bodies, series and the area of a trapezium.
1 envelope.
278 Paper on mathematical problems. A mathematical paper containing problems and equations and a list of candidates for election to the Royal Society: John Jeron Schroler, Lilienthal, Bremen; Joseph (Giuseppe) Piazzi, Palermo, Sicily; Dr Olbers, Bremen; and Dr C.F. Gauss, Brunswick. There are propositions and corollaries from Newton's 'Principia', in Latin and English, and from Aristotle's 'Rhetoric', in Greek and English.
1 envelope.
1802
279 Mathematical problems and equations. Undated mathematical problems and equations, including trigonometrical calculations and difference tables.
1 envelope.
280 Astronomical problems. Miscellaneous astronomical problems, computations and tables, with comparisons of the Sun from 1701 to Maskelyne's time, the distance of the Moon from a fixed star, and tables of the Moon's parallax in altitude and parallactic logarithms.
1 envelope.
circa 1800
281 Mathematical determination of position. Equations to ascertain latitude and longitude, refractions, the area of a spherical triangle and the lunar distance. Some of the rules are from Maskelyne's paper in 'Philosophical Transactions', 52 (1762), p. 568.
1 volume.
1763
282 Principles of navigation. Principles of navigation with reference to lunar distances and to the errors caused by various factors, undated.
1 volume.
283 A work on navigation. An undated work on navigation, including how to find the radius of a parallel to the equator, with mention of Leonhard Euler's work on the magnetic poles.
1 volume.
284 Navigational tables and calculations. Miscellaneous equations and unfinished tables relating to navigation.
1 volume.
1750
285 Navigational tables and calculations. Miscellaneous equations and unfinished tables relating to navigation, with pieces on Wright's method of finding the azimuth and on using observed distance to ascertain horizontal distance. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
286 Mercator's Sailing. Various calculations and logarithmic problems associated with finding latitude and longitude to find the course on which a ship should be steered. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
287 Mercator's Sailing. Various calculations and problems associated with finding latitude and longitude to find the course on which a ship should be steered. The volume is undated.
1 volume.
288 Book on nautical astronomy. A book concerning nautical astronomy, including finding longitude at sea by means of the Moon's distance from the fixed stars, illustrated by examples from 1774. The items include the astronomical observations of Willem Barents, 1596-1597; a comparative table of thermometer scales; and a list of flora.
1 envelope.
1774
289 Astronomical equations and tables. Tables of altitudes at Cambridge, Eustachio Zanotti's observations of the transit of Venus of 1761, parallax of the Sun by transit observations, 'Halley's problem', and the problems of converting from heliocentric to geocentric longitudes.
1 volume.
1761
290 Paper on sundials. 'Problems relating to dials.'.
1 volume.
1770
291 Tables on parallax and occultations. Occultations between 8 March 1767 and 23 December 1768, preceded by tables and problems on parallax.
1 volume.
1767–1768
292 Errors in lunar distances. 'To clear the distance of the Moon from a star from the effects of refraction and parallax', February 1766. The envelope include copies of reports made to the Board of Longitude by John Howe, undated, and M. Roper of Thorley Hall, 9 July 1765, on the method of Israel Lyons and George Witchell for correcting observed distances. There are also a number of tables on the Sun's parallax.
1 envelope.
1765–1766
293 Paper on transit instrument errors. An undated paper posing a problem in finding the errors in a transit instrument.
1 volume.
294 Description of Hooke's reflecting quadrant. An undated description of a model of Robert Hooke's reflecting quadrant.
1 envelope.
295 Account of Hadley's quadrant. An undated account of John Hadley's quadrant and its capabilities and effectiveness for observations at sea.
1 volume.
296 Astronomical observations and reductions. Astronomical reductions and observations, including an eclipse of 25 June 1767; the Sun's place and an eclipse at Greenwich, 3 June 1769; an extract from a letter by Captain Wallis, 20 June 1771; and an account of experiments carried out on board the vessel 'Carcass' on a voyage to the north pole with Captain Phipps. The observations were made on 3 June - 10 July 1772 for latitude and longitude as determined by Arnold's chronometer and Kendall's watch. Other experiments were performed on magnetic variation and dip, temperature at different depths in the oceans and lunar observations.
1 envelope.
1767–1773
297 Booklet on optics, mathematics, physics and astronomy. Optical diagrams and sections on the ellipse, plane trigonometry, the construction of the trigonometrical canon, spherical trigonometry, the construction of a logarithmetical canon, properties of plane and spherical triangles, mechanics and the properties of matter, laws of motion, composition and resolution of forces and gravity, centres of gravity and mechanical powers, and propositions relating to the cycloid, optics and the rainbow. There are tables on the elements of the motions in a parabolic orbit of all comets observed and on calculating the motion of comets, and notes on how to compute the apparent place of a comet at any time. There are also a large number of diagrams to illustrate these topics.
1 volume.
1753
298 Papers on astronomy, physics and mathematics. Miscellaneous astronomical, physical and mathematical topics, including sections on the following:. 1. Primary planets (23 remarks); comet tails (4 points); James Bradley's parallax: tides; centripetal forces (misbound); lunar apsides and inequalities; projectiles in a parabola (19 observations); centripetal forces (16 rules); cycloid (16 statements); capillary tubes, written in Latin; infinites (9 characteristics); propositions from Newton's 'Principia'; primary rainbows; velocity as space when time is given; and globes and cylinders (6 features). 2. The properties of matter; (Newton's) three laws of motion; the composition of forces; gravity; planets' revolutions; the rings of Saturn; winds; and properties of pulses of sound. On page 10 is a diagram of 'A fire engine that spouts continually'. 3. Roger Cotes' experiments in hydrostatics, 2 April 1754, with tables of specific gravities of various materials and sketches of the apparatus used. 4. Telescopical discoveries in the Sun and planets, 1656-1715, with sketches of the Sun and Saturn. 5. Explanation of the figures in James Drake's 'Anatomy'.
1 envelope.
circa 1754
299 Text on the Arabic language. 'Grammatica Arabica compendiosa del Sr Nicolo Nairone Bancsio', undated.
1 envelope.
300 Liberties and customs of the mines. An undated fair copy of the medieval privileges, laws and customs bestowed upon miners by Edward I.
1 envelope.
301 Memorials and royal instructions. Four memorials and royal instructions. 1. Letter from the Royal Society, 2 June 1726, on the purchase of equipment and instruments for the Observatory, autographed by Sir Isaac Newton. 2. Instructions to the Astronomer Royal regarding his residing at Greenwich, the need for security at the Observatory, the scrutinizing of observations and the publication of findings. 3. A memorial to King George III, with a brief history of the appointments of the Astronomical Observator and the Board of Visitors, written when the post of Astronomical Observator became vacant after the death of Nathaniel Bliss. 4. Regulations for the execution of the office of Astronomer Royal.
1 bundle.
1726–1764
302 Appointments of the Astronomers Royal. Various letters and copies of the royal appointments of the Astronomers Royal. 1. Letter from the Royal Society, 5 March 1713, requesting the 1712 observations. 2. A copy of the official royal appointment of Nevil Maskelyne as Astronomer Royal, with the signature of the Earl of Sandwich. 3. A copy of the official royal appointment of James Bradley as Astronomer Royal, with the signature of Holles Newcastle. 4. A copy of the royal warrant for employment and payment of a salary of £100 per annum to John Flamsteed, 4 March 1675, with the signature of J. Williamson. 5. A copy of the official royal appointment of Edmond Halley as Astronomer Royal, 9 February 1720, with the signature of the Earl of Stanhope. 6. A copy of a notice by H. St John, Whitehall, 12 December 1710, to purchase and improve the instruments at the Observatory. 7. A copy of a letter from H. St John, Whitehall, 12 December 1710, setting out conditions for the Astronomer Royal to adhere to and giving notice to repair or replace defective equipment. 8. A copy of a warrant awarding a salary of £250 per annum to James Bradley, 15 February 1752, ratified for Nathaniel Bliss, 13 July 1762. The warrant is signed by H. Pelham, J. Campbell, G. Greenville and G. Lyttelton.
1 bundle.
circa 1713-circa 1762
303 Papers on management of the Observatory. Various papers concerned with the management of the Royal Observatory. 1. Report from the Visitors of the Royal Observatory at Greenwich, 21 June 1775. 2. Piece on the permanent appointment of Visitors, 1 September 1764. 3. Minutes of the Royal Society, 12 May 1726 and 2 March 1727, regarding the Observatory's equipment and the presentation of the observations. 4. Letter to the Board of Visitors, 4 September 1713, signed by C. Hargreaves, refusing to pay for repairs to the instruments from the Office of Ordnance.
1 envelope.
1713–1775
304 Papers on the Observatory's history. Various papers on the history the Royal Observatory, probably written by John Pond. 1. Resumé of the careers of Nevil Maskelyne and Sir Jonas Moore, with a note on the death of James Bradley. . 2. Summary of the history of the Observatory, John Flamsteed and Edmond Halley. This was originally the first part of no. 1. 3. Important dates in the history of the Observatory.
1 envelope.
1811
305 Papers on Observatory Visitors. Various loose papers concerning the Visitors to the Royal Observatory. 1. Accounts and breakdown of a £1000 grant showing how it was spent, 12 January 1748. There is also an inventory of the instruments at the Observatory, signed by Nathaniel Bliss, 18 August 1762. 2. Report from the Royal Society committee on the refurbishment of the Observatory, 26 May 1726, including accounts. 3. The case presented by the Royal Society on the validity of the orders creating the Board of Visitors and legal opinion from the Attorney General and the Solicitor General on this point and on the ownership of the observations, 1764.
1 bundle.
1726–1764
306 Papers on the Royal Society. Various loose papers concerning the Royal Society. 1. Dates of meetings of the Board of Longitude and Council of the Royal Society in which James Bradley's papers were mentioned, and a description of attempts by the Royal Society to recover Bradley's observations. 2. Regulations for the execution of the office of Astronomer Royal. 3. Letter from William Kirkby to Mr Da Costa at the Royal Society, 18 September 1764, regarding the death of Nathaniel Bliss, mentioning that the Paper Office has mislaid Flamsteed's appointment.
1 envelope.
1764
307 Papers on the Observatory's condition. Various loose papers on the condition of the Royal Observatory. 1. Report from the Royal Society committee on the refurbishment of the Observatory, 26 May 1726, including accounts. 2. Report from the Royal Society committee on the refurbishment of the Observatory, 26 May 1726, including accounts. 3. Letter on the poor condition of the equatorial instruments and the employment of Jesse Ramsden to effect their repair, 5 October 1775, with the autographs of Henry Cavendish and Nevil Maskelyne. 4. Letter from Jesse Ramsden, 13 October 1775, regarding the improvements and faults to be rectified in the equatorial sector.
1 envelope.
1726–1775
308 Papers on Observatory instruments. Various loose papers on the instruments at the Royal Observatory. 1. Inventory of the mathematical and astronomical instruments at the Royal Observatory, 16 March 1765. 2. Application for a new equatorial sector and two new rooms, with a breakdown of the costs involved, 1767-1770. 3. Minutes and those present at some Councils of the Royal Society, 30 May 1711 - 2 March 1727, regarding the instruments and conditions at the Royal Observatory, extracted from the Council Book of the Royal Society, Vol. 2, 1711-1726. 4. Minutes and those present at some Councils of the Royal Society, 10 August 1748 - 4 November 1762, regarding the instruments and conditions at the Royal Observatory, extracted from the Council Book of the Royal Society, Vol. 4, pp. 5-6, 1748-1762.
1 envelope.
1711–1770
309 Papers on the Annual Visitation and inventories. Loose papers, with details of Annual Visitations and Observatory instruments. 1. Visitation to the Royal Observatory, with Maskelyne's suggestions for improvements, 10 July 1795. 2. An account of new instruments acquired and alterations to those already in the Observatory's possession, 14 December 1774. 3. A rough copy of the first page of the report of the Visitors to the Observatory, 14 December 1774. 4. A rough copy of the inventory and report of the Visitors to the Observatory, 14 December 1774. . 5. Inventory and report of the Visitors to the Observatory, 14 December 1774. 6. Visitation and inventory of the Royal Observatory, 21 June 1775. 7. A further inventory of the Royal Observatory, 21 June 1775. 8. Visitation of the Royal Observatory detailing repairs and improvements to be made, 2 June 1777. 9. Visitation to the Royal Observatory detailing repairs and improvements to be made, 13 July 1778.
1 envelope.
1774–1795
310 Extracts from Board of Longitude minutes. Extracts from the Minutes of the Board of Longitude, including the findings on John Harrison's chronometers.
1 bundle.
1737–1765
311 Trials of Harrison's chronometers. Observations and comparisons during the trials of John Harrison's chronometers (H1, H2, H3 and H4) and Kendall I, with mean solar time, 1766-1767, and the rating of the Royal Observatory transit clock, 1771. The volume is comprised largely of tables of measurements, with some descriptions of how the results were achieved.
1 volume.
1766–1771
312 Books on chronometer trials. Nine exercise books bound together, containing the rating of chronometers and watches. 1. Comparison of Harrison 4 and Kendall I from 19 March 1770 until 15 February 1773, when Kendall I was not used. John Arnold's watch was used as a comparison from 27 July to 13 December 1774, and Kendall I was used once more from 1 August 1775. The Harrison 4 observations end on 1 September 1775. Kendall I and III are compared for 22 April - 11 June 1776. 2. Daily rating of Thomas Mudge's 'Green' and 'Blue' time-keepers, 21 July 1783 - 12 September 1784. 3. Daily rating of Mudge's watch, 14 December 1774 - 26 February 1778, and comparison of Mudge's 'Green' and 'Blue' time-keepers, 20 April 1779 - 17 July 1780. 4. Comparison of Mudge's 'Green' and 'Blue' time-keepers, 22 June 1789 - 20 June 1790, calculated by John Crosley. 5. Rating of Coombe's watch, 29 June 1779 - 26 January 1780. 6. Daily comparison of Mudge's 'Green' and 'Blue' time-keepers, 21 July 1783 - 12 September 1784. The rates have been kept separate for the two watches. 7. Rates for Mudge's first time-keeper from 14 December 1774, and kept daily from 11 November 1776 to 16 February 1778. . 8. Separate daily rates of Mudge's 'Green' and 'Blue' time-keepers, 20 April 1779 - 17 July 1780. 9. Computed variation in Mudge's 'Green' and 'Blue' time-keepers, 24 June 1789 - 29 June 1790, with a note on how the tests were performed.
1 volume.
1770–1790
313 Warrant from Duke of Newcastle. A warrant from the Prime Minister, the Duke of Newcastle, ordering that Maskelyne pay his assistant £17 10s 0d per quarter. There is also an untitled diagram.
1 envelope.
20 Aug. 1778
314 Correspondence. Various notes and letters. 1. Letter from A. Sheppard, 12 February 1771, giving the dates of commencement of university terms. 2. A balance of payments, 30 October 1810. 3. Account between Maskelyne and the Board of Longitude, 6 October 1810. 4. Note for Mrs Edwards, a comparer, relating to some observations. 5. Dates on which pieces for the 1816 'Nautical Almanac' were received from the computers, 1810-1811. 6. A letter to John Crosley, 15 October 1810, noting various computations to be performed. 7. List of dates to be computed for the 'Nautical Almanac' by John Pascoe, 1799-1808, Nicholas James, 1806-1808, and Henry Andrews, 1806-1808. 8. Account of John Crosley's work, 15 January 1811. 9. Alterations in the dates on which Oxford University terms begin and end, from Mr Bensley. 10. A letter from Abram Robertson, May 1809, giving dates of Oxford University terms. 11. Note of work received for the 'Nautical Almanac', 1810. 12. Predictions of astronomical events for 1815, made in 1810. 13 A receipt from Mrs Edwards, Ludlow, Herefordshire, 4 April 1786, for repairs made to a reflecting telescope. 14. Work for the 1816 'Nautical Almanac' due in, and a note of payment to Mary Edwards. 15. The rates of pay for comparers and computers. 16. Maskelyne's account with the Board of Longitude, 1809-1810.
1 volume.
1771-circa 1811
315 Solutions to mathematical problems. Various undated mathematical problems, with their solutions in diagrammatic and algebraic form.
1 volume.
316 Supplement to star catalogue. A supplement to the catalogue of stars observed in 1725-1739, and a Latin piece on comparisons between other people's star catalogues, 1773.
1 envelope.
circa 1740-circa 1773
317 Book list of scientific and astronomical works. An undated book list of various scientific and astronomical works.
1 envelope.
318 Records of instrument adjustments. A book for recording adjustments to instruments, with instructions, remarks and calculations. The volume includes notes on the magnifying power of the 46-inch achromatic telescope and the times taken for stars to pass through its field of vision; a plan for a meridian mark; the rate of the transit clock, 1766-1771; various parts to star catalogues; finding the right ascensions of stars; observations, 31 July - 3 November 1768; and solutions to hypothetical astronomical problems.
1 volume.
circa 1766-circa 1780
319 Horologemetria. A copy of William Jones' 'Horologemetria', a booklet on finding latitude and longitude, annotated by the author with notes and problems. There is a dedication by Jones, including his autograph, dated 8 June 1731.
1 volume.
1731
320 Miscellaneous papers. 1. Calculation of micrometer observations made in Barbados in 1764 with Short's 2 foot reflector. 2. A bill for books, 13 October 1769, covering the period 1762-1769, sent to Maskelyne and receipted by John Nourse. 3. A bill for bookbinding from James Shore, 26 February 1789, covering 1789-1790, with a receipt from Deborah Shore. 4. A bill for books and money owed to Dr Shepherd for the period 1785-1790. 5. Draft of a letter to the Royal Society, 12 July 1770, on the inadequacy of the equatorial sector for observing comets. 6. List of publications by Maskelyne in the 'Philosophical Transactions' and elsewhere, 1761-1814. 7. Maskelyne's undated draft, probably for the First Lord of the Admiralty, on the eclipses of Jupiter's satellites and the deduction of longitude from observations on board HMS 'Princess Louisa' on a voyage to Barbados. He mentions his inability to make these observations from either of Mr Irwin's marine chairs, which he had been asked by the Commissioners of the Board of Longitude to use and give an opinion on. On the reverse are observations made by Maskelyne whilst in Barbados. 8. Autobiographical notes by Maskelyne on his life up to c. 1789, including his early life, his discoveries, the expedition to St Helena, the work of the Board of Longitude and the work of other contemporaries. There is a note on the front written in the hand of his wife, Margaret Maskelyne. 9. Publications by Maskelyne in 'Philosophical Transactions', 1761-1787. 10. Resumé by Maskelyne of his career, 1732-1793, giving some important dates. 11. Resumé by Maskelyne of his career, 1732-1801, giving some important dates and including a piece on Johann Mayer's lunar tables. 12. 'Two sealing wax impressions of a signet ring showing head of Newton? with a comet device behind the head.'.
1 envelope.
circa 1764-circa 1814
321 Log book of voyage to Barbados. A log book by Maskelyne of a voyage to Barbados, split into three parts. 1. 'Celestial observations made on board his Majesty's ship the Princess Louisa, Admiral Tyrell by Nevil Maskelyne FRS', including mathematical equations and methods for finding the inclination of the ecliptic to the horizon; how the observations were taken and with what instruments; a log of the observations covering the period 20 September to 8 November 1763 (broken into two parts: 20 September-18 October and 19 October-8 November); and an explanation of the observations, with annotations. 2. 'Journal of a voyage from England to Barbados in his Majesty's ship Princess Louisa, Captain Norwood, Admiral Tyrell by Nevil Maskelyne FRS Chaplain of the ship.' There are tables showing the course set and meteorological conditions on the voyage. There is also a sketch of an unnamed island, possibly Barbados, and a number of loose computations, including comparisons of observations from voyages, 1761-1764, to ascertain errors in the quadrant; observations. of stars; meridian altitudes of the Sun's latitude by Maskelyne; and computations for finding longitude. 3. 'Observations for the longitude made on board the Princess Louisa Nov 2nd 1763 in the morning by Mr. Nevil Maskelyne', including observations and computations for the longitude made that day and on days previous to 2 November, and a summary with comments of errors and alterations to instruments and bearings for landmarks in Barbados.
1 volume.
1761–1764
322 Rating of longitude watches on HMS 'Adventure'. 'Account of the going of the two longitude watches on board His Majesty's sloop, the Adventure Captain Furneaux Commander bound towards the South Seas.' Only two pages of the account and a cover survive. The rating of the watches covers the period 13-29 July 1772.
2 sheets.
1772
323 Observations at Barbados. 'Astronomical observations made of the Island of Barbados by Nevil Maskelyne AM FRS.' The log covers the rating of clocks, observations of stars and planets, and errors and adjustments to instruments and clocks, 13 November 1763 - 15 August 1764. It mentions the arrival of John Harrison and his chronometers on board H.M.S. 'Tartar' on 13 May 1764, and includes ratings for these chronometers. There are lists of other observations on the cover of the log and some computations on loose pieces of paper.
1 volume.
1763–1764
324 Diary of 'Nautical Almanac' work. A diary of work performed on the 'Nautical Almanac' and arrangements for its compilation and publication. 1. Notes on changes in pay for computers and comparers, 1767-1815; stationary requirements; computation of wages; and the number of 'Nautical Almanacs' published, 1790-1814. 2. Orders and memoranda for paper and the sending of copies of the 'Nautical Almanac', 1790-1804. 3. A list of computers and comparers for the 'Nautical Almanac', 1803-1810. 4. Board of Longitude edict for changes in the computer's work and a list of institutions to receive the astronomical observations of voyages undertaken from 1764 to 1771. 5. Diary of tasks for Mrs Mary Edwards of Ludlow, Shropshire, to compute, 1794-1798. 6. Diary of tasks for Henry Andrews to compute, 1794-1809. 7. Diary of tasks for the Rev. Malachy Hitchins to compute, 1794-1809. 8. Diary of tasks for Francis Simmonds to compute, 1794-1809. 9. Diary of publications sent to Mr Buckton to print, 1793-1811. 10. Diary of Board of Longitude publications sent to Thomas Bersley to print, 1799-1811. 11. Diary of publications sent to Philip Turner to be printed, 1794-1806. 12. Diary of publications sent to William Dawes to be printed, 1798-1813. 13. Diary of tasks sent to John Crosley to compute, 1799-1809. 14. Diary of payments by the Board of Longitude for outstanding bills, 1799-1809. 15. Diary of tasks sent to William Wales to compute, 1794-1799. 16. Diary of tasks sent to John Pascoe of Honiton, Devon, to compute, 1799-1810. 17. Diary of tasks sent to Nicholas James, St Hilary, Marazion, Cornwall, to compute, 1800-1809. 18. Diary of tasks sent to John Williams to compute, 1800-1806. 19. List of computers and comparers for the 'Nautical Almanac', 1811-1814. 20. Diary of tasks sent to George Sanderson to compute, 1801-1808. 21. Lists of institutions and persons receiving Board of Longitude publications. 22. Diary of tasks sent to Richard Martyn, Goldsithney, Marazion, Cornwall, to compute, 1801-1809. 23. Computations on epochs from 1816. 24. Lists of computers and comparers for the 'Nautical Almanac', 1815-1816. 25. Diary of tasks sent to David Kinnebrook of Norwich to compute, 1801-1802. 26. Entry of tasks sent to William Shives to compute, 1804. 27. Memoranda on directions for computers, dates of Oxford and Cambridge terms, and a list of current computers, 1809. 28. Diary of tasks sent to Benjamin Workman to compute, 1809-1810. 29. Diary of tasks sent to William Dunkin, St Hilary, Cornwall, to compute, 1809. 30. Diary of tasks sent to Thomas Brown, Tideswell, Derbyshire, to compute, 1809-1810. 31. Duties to be performed by a computer. 32. Duties to be performed by a comparer. 33. Further directions given to computers. 34. Rules for finding distances of stars and for computing the distance of the moon from a star. 35. Memoranda and guidelines given to computers.
1 volume.
circa 1767-circa 1816
325 Account book for computers and comparers. 'Accounts with the computers and comparers of the Nautical Almanac.' The accounts include monies received from the Board of Longitude, 1766-1792, and money paid out to computers and comparers for work on the 'Nautical Almanac': George Witchell, 1766-1768; Israel Lyons, 1766-1769; John Mapson, 1766-1782; William Wales, 1766-1788; Rev. Malachy Hitchins, 1768-1808; Charles Barton, 1766-1775; Reuben Robbins, 1768-1778; Joseph Keech, 1768-1778; Henry Andrews, 1769-1810; Rev. John Edwards, 1775-1790; Walter Steel, 1768-1774; John Hollins, 1777; Richard Dunthorne, 1767-1774; William Bayly, 1776-1791; George Gilpin, 1771-1787; James Stephens, 1774-1780; Michael Taylor, 1776-1788; Charles Hutton, 1777-1779; Richard Coffin, 1778-1786; Joshua Moore, 1788-1790; Mary Edwards, 1795-1811; Francis Simmonds, 1794-1799; Philip Turner, 1796-1800; John Crosley, 1801-1811; Commissioners of Longitude, 1791-1809; John Williams, 1800-1803; Nicholas James, 1800-1809; John Pascoe, 1801-1807; David Kinnebrook Jnr, 1801-1802; Richard Martyn, 1809-1811; Benjamin Workman, 1809-1811; Thomas Brown, 1810-1811; and William Garrard, 1810-1811.
1 volume.
1766–1811
326 Hutton's mathematical tables. Charles Hutton's manuscript calculations for 'New Divisions of the Circle', consisting entirely of various mathematical tables.
1 volume.
1783
327 Notebook of Joseph Lindley. The principal part of the notebook is a transcription of a pamphlet by T. Clapp, late Professor of Valo College, entitled 'Conjectures upon the Nature and Motion of Meteors &c', dated 1781, in which Clapp discusses the appearance, velocity, direction, noise, duration of visibility, frequency of appearance, apparent size and equivalent energy of the explosive concussion of meteors, together with the air resistance encountered by meteors and the conjecture that the flames from meteors are caused by 'electric fire'. There are further notes by Lindley on the 'Determination of the Longitude of Paris by Mr Arnold's watches'. These are accompanied by records of the rates of the eight chronometers used when going to and coming from Paris - the final result, giving the longitude of Paris as 9m19s.8 east (2º19'57" east), is signed by Lindley and dated at the Royal Observatory, 5 October 1785. The volume also includes a calculation of the longitude of Lynn in Norfolk, and tables of the increase of sidereal over mean solar time and of the right ascensions of prominent stars.
1 volume.
1785–1786
328 Letter from Alexander Dalrymple. A letter from Alexander Dalrymple enquiring about a Spanish book of geometry that demonstrates a method of squaring the circle, and requesting Maskelyne provide a list of the publications of his that he does not have so that he can send those that are missing. Maskelyne has written the requested list on the verso.
1 envelope.
31 Dec. 1771

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